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Title: Stability of Supported Platinum Sulfuric Acid Decomposition Catalysts for use in Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycles

Abstract

The activity and stability of several metal oxide supported platinum catalysts were explored for the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. The acid decomposition reaction is common to several sulfur based thermochemical water splitting cycles. Reactions were carried out using a feed of concentrated liquid sulfuric acid (96 wt%) at atmospheric pressure at temperatures between 800 and 850 °C and a weight hour space velocity of 52 g acid/g catalyst/hr. Reactions were run at these high space velocities such that variations in kinetics were not masked by surplus catalyst. The influence of exposure to reaction conditions was explored for three catalysts; 0.1-0.2 wt% Pt supported on alumina, zirconia and titania. The higher surface area Pt/Al2O3 and Pt/ZrO2 catalysts were found to have the highest activity but deactivated rapidly. A low surface area Pt/TiO2 catalyst was found to have good stability in short term tests, but slowly lost activity for over 200 hours of continuous operation.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - NE
OSTI Identifier:
912361
Report Number(s):
INL/JOU-05-00546
Journal ID: ISSN 0360-3199; IJHEDX; TRN: US200801%%795
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Hydrogen Energy; Journal Volume: 32; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 - HYDROGEN; ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE; CATALYSTS; KINETICS; OXIDES; PLATINUM; STABILITY; SULFUR; SULFURIC ACID; SURFACE AREA; VELOCITY; WATER; Catalyst stability; Hydrogen; Sulfur cycles; Sulfuric acid decomposition

Citation Formats

Daniel M. Ginosar, Lucia M. Petkovic, Anne W. Glenn, and Kyle C. Burch. Stability of Supported Platinum Sulfuric Acid Decomposition Catalysts for use in Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycles. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijhydene.2006.06.053.
Daniel M. Ginosar, Lucia M. Petkovic, Anne W. Glenn, & Kyle C. Burch. Stability of Supported Platinum Sulfuric Acid Decomposition Catalysts for use in Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycles. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijhydene.2006.06.053.
Daniel M. Ginosar, Lucia M. Petkovic, Anne W. Glenn, and Kyle C. Burch. Thu . "Stability of Supported Platinum Sulfuric Acid Decomposition Catalysts for use in Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycles". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijhydene.2006.06.053.
@article{osti_912361,
title = {Stability of Supported Platinum Sulfuric Acid Decomposition Catalysts for use in Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycles},
author = {Daniel M. Ginosar and Lucia M. Petkovic and Anne W. Glenn and Kyle C. Burch},
abstractNote = {The activity and stability of several metal oxide supported platinum catalysts were explored for the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. The acid decomposition reaction is common to several sulfur based thermochemical water splitting cycles. Reactions were carried out using a feed of concentrated liquid sulfuric acid (96 wt%) at atmospheric pressure at temperatures between 800 and 850 °C and a weight hour space velocity of 52 g acid/g catalyst/hr. Reactions were run at these high space velocities such that variations in kinetics were not masked by surplus catalyst. The influence of exposure to reaction conditions was explored for three catalysts; 0.1-0.2 wt% Pt supported on alumina, zirconia and titania. The higher surface area Pt/Al2O3 and Pt/ZrO2 catalysts were found to have the highest activity but deactivated rapidly. A low surface area Pt/TiO2 catalyst was found to have good stability in short term tests, but slowly lost activity for over 200 hours of continuous operation.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijhydene.2006.06.053},
journal = {International Journal of Hydrogen Energy},
number = 4,
volume = 32,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}