skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Explosives Detection and Identification by PGNAA

Abstract

The feasibility of using field-portable prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) to detect and identify explosives in improvised nuclear devices has been studied computationally, using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Monte Carlo results, in turn were tested experimentally using explosive simulants and the PINS PGNAA system developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The results of the MCNP calculations and PINS measurements have been previously reported. In this report we describe measurements performed on actual explosives and compare the results with calculations. The calculations and measurements were in good agreement and indicate that most explosives are readily distinguishable from one another by PGNAA

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
911698
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-06-01210
TRN: US0800090
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 - INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; DETECTION; EXPLOSIVES; LANL; NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS; explosives; Monte Carlo; prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis

Citation Formats

E. H. Seabury, and A. J. Caffrey. Explosives Detection and Identification by PGNAA. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/911698.
E. H. Seabury, & A. J. Caffrey. Explosives Detection and Identification by PGNAA. United States. doi:10.2172/911698.
E. H. Seabury, and A. J. Caffrey. 2006. "Explosives Detection and Identification by PGNAA". United States. doi:10.2172/911698. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/911698.
@article{osti_911698,
title = {Explosives Detection and Identification by PGNAA},
author = {E. H. Seabury and A. J. Caffrey},
abstractNote = {The feasibility of using field-portable prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) to detect and identify explosives in improvised nuclear devices has been studied computationally, using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Monte Carlo results, in turn were tested experimentally using explosive simulants and the PINS PGNAA system developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The results of the MCNP calculations and PINS measurements have been previously reported. In this report we describe measurements performed on actual explosives and compare the results with calculations. The calculations and measurements were in good agreement and indicate that most explosives are readily distinguishable from one another by PGNAA},
doi = {10.2172/911698},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2006,
month = 4
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • The goal of this project was to determine the feasibility of using field-portable prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) to detect and identify explosives in improvised nuclear devices (INDs). The studies were carried out using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The model results were tested experimentally using explosive simulants and the PINS PGNAA system developed at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The results of the MCNP calculations and PINS measurements are presented in this report. The calculations and measurements were in good agreement and indicate that most explosives are readily distinguishablemore » from one another.« less
  • Prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) is now a proven method for the identification of chemical warfare agents and explosives in military projectiles and storage containers. Idaho National Laboratory is developing a next-generation PGNAA instrument based on the new Ortec Detective mechanically-cooled HPGe detector and a neutron generator. In this paper we review PGNAA analysis of suspect chemical warfare munitions, and we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of replacing the californium-252 radioisotopic neutron source with a compact accelerator neutron generator.
  • This feasibility study has identified and evaluated the influence of important matrix effects which arise in the commercial application of prompt gamma/neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) methods to bulk-coal analysis as follows: neutron moderation and absorption changes; gamma-ray attenuation in the sample; sample density and volume changes. The neutron-induced capture gamma spectra were found to vary in a similar, predictable manner for all neutron absorbers found in coal such as hydrogen, boron, nitrogen, chlorine, and sulfur. Three different models have been proposed from this study to analyze coal by PGNAA methods and account for the significant matrix effects arising from hydrogenmore » variation and other system perturbations.« less
  • This report reviews the progress accomplished during Phase I of a two-phase project intended to demonstrate the use of Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) as a technology for the characterization of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in concrete floors. A comprehensive experimental program was undertaken using the N-SCAN{trademark} PGNAA system, which was initially developed by Westinghouse for soil characterization, to determine the sensitivity of PGNAA for several contaminants in concrete. The experiments were performed in a test facility specially designed and constructed for this project. The lower limits of detection derived from the experimental data were encouraging for mercury, cadmium,more » uranium-238, thorium-232, technetium-99, chlorine, uranium-235 and chromium. These limits were achieved after modifications made to the original N-SCAN system significantly improved its sensitivity for elements located at or near the surface of concrete. With the implementation of additional performance-enhancing modifications scheduled in Phase II, the detection sensitivity of N-SCAN at the end of this project is expected to be at least one order of magnitude higher, allowing N-SCAN to become an effective characterization tool. N-SCAN has several important advantages over current characterization methods and technologies.« less