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Title: Evaluating In Situ Treatment Technologies for Buried Mixed Waste Remediation at the INEEL

Abstract

Mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes were buried at the Department of Energy’s Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Subsurface Disposal Area from 1952 to 1969. To begin the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process for the Subsurface Disposal Area, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) added the INEEL to its National Priorities List in 1989. DOE’s Office of Environmental Restoration is planning several CERCLA treatability studies of remedial technologies that will be evaluated for potential remediation of the buried waste in the Subsurface Disposal Area. This paper discusses the in situ treatability studies that will be performed, including in situ vitrification, in situ grouting, and in situ thermal desorption. The in situ treatability studies will be conducted on simulated and actual buried wastes at the INEEL in 1999 and 2000. Results from the treatability studies will provide substantial information on the feasibility, implementability, and cost of applying these technologies to the INEEL Subsurface Disposal Area. In addition, much of the treatability study data will be applicable to buried waste site remediation efforts across the DOE complex.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
911404
Report Number(s):
INEEL/CON-98-00879
TRN: US0704555
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Waste Management '99,Tucson, AZ,02/28/1999,03/04/1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 - GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; DESORPTION; GROUTING; INEEL; PLANNING; US EPA; US SUPERFUND; VITRIFICATION; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTES; Mixed Waste; remediation; SDA; Situ Treatment

Citation Formats

Jorgensen, Douglas Kay, Nickelson, David Frank, Nickelson, Reva Anne, Farnsworth, Richard Kent, and Jessmore, James Joseph. Evaluating In Situ Treatment Technologies for Buried Mixed Waste Remediation at the INEEL. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Jorgensen, Douglas Kay, Nickelson, David Frank, Nickelson, Reva Anne, Farnsworth, Richard Kent, & Jessmore, James Joseph. Evaluating In Situ Treatment Technologies for Buried Mixed Waste Remediation at the INEEL. United States.
Jorgensen, Douglas Kay, Nickelson, David Frank, Nickelson, Reva Anne, Farnsworth, Richard Kent, and Jessmore, James Joseph. 1999. "Evaluating In Situ Treatment Technologies for Buried Mixed Waste Remediation at the INEEL". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/911404.
@article{osti_911404,
title = {Evaluating In Situ Treatment Technologies for Buried Mixed Waste Remediation at the INEEL},
author = {Jorgensen, Douglas Kay and Nickelson, David Frank and Nickelson, Reva Anne and Farnsworth, Richard Kent and Jessmore, James Joseph},
abstractNote = {Mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes were buried at the Department of Energy’s Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Subsurface Disposal Area from 1952 to 1969. To begin the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process for the Subsurface Disposal Area, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) added the INEEL to its National Priorities List in 1989. DOE’s Office of Environmental Restoration is planning several CERCLA treatability studies of remedial technologies that will be evaluated for potential remediation of the buried waste in the Subsurface Disposal Area. This paper discusses the in situ treatability studies that will be performed, including in situ vitrification, in situ grouting, and in situ thermal desorption. The in situ treatability studies will be conducted on simulated and actual buried wastes at the INEEL in 1999 and 2000. Results from the treatability studies will provide substantial information on the feasibility, implementability, and cost of applying these technologies to the INEEL Subsurface Disposal Area. In addition, much of the treatability study data will be applicable to buried waste site remediation efforts across the DOE complex.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1999,
month = 3
}

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  • Mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes were buried at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Subsurface Disposal Area from 1952 to 1969. To begin the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process for the Subsurface Disposal Area, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) added the INEEL to its National Priorities List in 1989. DOE's Office of Environmental Restoration is planning several CERCLA treatability studies of remedial technologies that will be evaluated for potential remediation of the buried waste in the Subsurface Disposal Area. This paper discusses the in situ treatability studies that will bemore » performed, including in situ vitrification, in situ grouting, and in situ thermal desorption. The in situ treatability studies will be conducted on simulated and actual buried wastes at the INEEL in 1999 and 2000. Results from the treatability studies will provide substantial information on the feasibility, implementability, and cost of applying these technologies to the INEEL Subsurface Disposal Area. In addition, much of the treatability study data will be applicable to buried waste site remediation efforts across the DOE complex.« less
  • This report discusses treatment of mixed wastes which is thought to be more complicated than treatment of either hazardous or radioactive wastes. In fact, the treatment itself is no more complicated: however, the regulations that define acceptability of the final waste disposal system are significantly more entangled, and sometimes in apparent conflict. This session explores the factors that influence the choice of waste treatment technologies, and expands on some of the limitations to their application. The objective of the presentation is to describe the technical factors that influence potential treatment processes and the ramifications associated with particular selections (for example,more » the generation of secondary waste streams). These collectively provide a framework for making informed treatment process selections.« less
  • This report discusses treatment of mixed wastes which is thought to be more complicated than treatment of either hazardous or radioactive wastes. In fact, the treatment itself is no more complicated: however, the regulations that define acceptability of the final waste disposal system are significantly more entangled, and sometimes in apparent conflict. This session explores the factors that influence the choice of waste treatment technologies, and expands on some of the limitations to their application. The objective of the presentation is to describe the technical factors that influence potential treatment processes and the ramifications associated with particular selections (for example,more » the generation of secondary waste streams). These collectively provide a framework for making informed treatment process selections.« less
  • This compendium contains brief summaries of new and developing non- thermal treatment technologies that are candidates for treating hazardous or mixed (hazardous plus low-level radioactive) wastes. It is written to be all-encompassing, sometimes including concepts that presently constitute little more than informed ``ideas``. It bounds the universe of existing technologies being thought about or considered for application on the treatment of such wastes. This compendium is intended to be the very first step in a winnowing process to identify non-thermal treatment systems that can be fashioned into complete ``cradle-to-grave`` systems for study. The purpose of the subsequent systems paper studiesmore » is to investigate the cost and likely performance of such systems treating a representative sample of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mixed low level wastes (MLLW). The studies are called Integrated Non-thermal Treatment Systems (INTS) Studies and are being conducted by the Office of Science and Technology (OST) of the Environmental Management (EM) of the US Department of Energy. Similar studies on Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems have recently been published. These are not designed nor intended to be a ``downselection`` of such technologies; rather, they are simply a systems evaluation of the likely costs and performance of various non- thermal technologies that have been arranged into systems to treat sludges, organics, metals, soils, and debris prevalent in MLLW.« less
  • An instrumentation system consisting of driven well-points, instrumentation bundles, and discrete sampling has been developed for monitoring subsurface conditions during the operation of air injection remediation systems. The driven well points provide intimate contact reducing the impact on the remediation process. The instrumentation bundles afford continuous monitoring of subsurface conditions. The saturated zone bundle provides information on dissolved oxygen, temperature, and ground water displacement for use in defining the volume of influence of air injection systems in the saturated zone. The vadose zone bundle provides data on changes in oxygen concentrations and temperature. Both bundles allow discrete sampling for laboratorymore » analysis. Criteria for sensor evaluation and laboratory testing protocols used for sensor evaluation are discussed. Also included are a description of the bundle housing and well-point layout at a field site.« less