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Title: Crack Growth Monitoring in Harsh Environments by Electric Potential Measurements

Abstract

Electric potential measurement (EPM) technology offers an attractive alternative to conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for monitoring crack growth in harsh environments. Where conventional NDE methods typically require localized human interaction, the EPM technique developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) can be operated remotely and automatically. Once a crack-like defect is discovered via conventional means, EPM can be applied to monitor local crack size changes. This is of particular interest in situations where an identified structural defect is not immediately rejectable from a fitness-for-service viewpoint, but due to operational and environmental conditions may grow to an unsafe size with continuing operation. If the location is in a harsh environment where periodic monitoring by normal means is either too costly or not possible, a very expensive repair may be immediately mandated. However, the proposed EPM methodology may offer a unique monitoring capability that would allow for continuing service. INEEL has developed this methodology, supporting equipment, and calibration information to apply EPM in a field environment for just this purpose. Laboratory and pilot scale tests on full-size engineering structures (pressure vessels and piping) have been successfully performed. The technique applicable is many severe environments because the sensitive equipment (electronics,more » operators) can be situated in a remote location, with only current and voltage probe electrical leads entering into the harsh environment. Experimental results showing the utility of the methodology are presented, and unique application concepts that have been examined by multiple experiments are discussed.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
911394
Report Number(s):
INEEL/CON-99-00889
TRN: US0704551
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Photonics East '99 - Environmental and Industrial Sensing; Harsh Environment Sensors II,Boston, MA,09/19/1999,09/22/1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 - INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; CALIBRATION; CRACK PROPAGATION; DEFECTS; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; EVALUATION; INEEL; MONITORING; MONITORS; PROBES; REPAIR; crack growth monitoring; electric potential measurement; fracture mechanics; lifetime extension; piping inspection; plant safety; severe environments

Citation Formats

Lloyd, Wilson Randolph, Reuter, Walter Graham, and Weinberg, David Michael. Crack Growth Monitoring in Harsh Environments by Electric Potential Measurements. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Lloyd, Wilson Randolph, Reuter, Walter Graham, & Weinberg, David Michael. Crack Growth Monitoring in Harsh Environments by Electric Potential Measurements. United States.
Lloyd, Wilson Randolph, Reuter, Walter Graham, and Weinberg, David Michael. Wed . "Crack Growth Monitoring in Harsh Environments by Electric Potential Measurements". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/911394.
@article{osti_911394,
title = {Crack Growth Monitoring in Harsh Environments by Electric Potential Measurements},
author = {Lloyd, Wilson Randolph and Reuter, Walter Graham and Weinberg, David Michael},
abstractNote = {Electric potential measurement (EPM) technology offers an attractive alternative to conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for monitoring crack growth in harsh environments. Where conventional NDE methods typically require localized human interaction, the EPM technique developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) can be operated remotely and automatically. Once a crack-like defect is discovered via conventional means, EPM can be applied to monitor local crack size changes. This is of particular interest in situations where an identified structural defect is not immediately rejectable from a fitness-for-service viewpoint, but due to operational and environmental conditions may grow to an unsafe size with continuing operation. If the location is in a harsh environment where periodic monitoring by normal means is either too costly or not possible, a very expensive repair may be immediately mandated. However, the proposed EPM methodology may offer a unique monitoring capability that would allow for continuing service. INEEL has developed this methodology, supporting equipment, and calibration information to apply EPM in a field environment for just this purpose. Laboratory and pilot scale tests on full-size engineering structures (pressure vessels and piping) have been successfully performed. The technique applicable is many severe environments because the sensitive equipment (electronics, operators) can be situated in a remote location, with only current and voltage probe electrical leads entering into the harsh environment. Experimental results showing the utility of the methodology are presented, and unique application concepts that have been examined by multiple experiments are discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}

Conference:
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