skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: FreedomCAR - Aftertreatment Subsystem Development

Abstract

The primary objective of this program was to develop generic aftertreatment technologies applicable for LDV and LDT engines ranging from 55 kW to 200kW, to develop an optimized and integrated aftertreatment system for a LDT (Light Duty Truck) type vehicle, and to demonstrate the technology which will enable light duty diesel engines to meet Federal Tier II regulation with minimum impact on fuel economy. Specifically, the development targets for emissions reduction and fuel injection penalty are given below: (1) NOx conversion efficiency > 90% (hot), > 84% (combined); (2) PM conversion efficiency > 90% (hot), > 84% (combined); (3) Fuel penalty over FTP-75 Less than 5%; and (4) Fuel penalty at Cruise condition Less than 3%. Development of cost-effective, highly efficient diesel exhaust aftertreatment systems in combination with very low engine out emission combustion development are essential elements for realization of Federal Tier II emission standards for Light Duty Trucks and Vehicles. Evaluation of several aftertreatment technologies was completed as part of this program. A combination of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst, NOx Adsorbing Catalyst and Catalyzed Soot Filter was found to provide the levels of conversion efficiency required to achieve the emission targets. While early systems required relatively large catalyst volumes,more » external dosing, sulfur traps, full bypass configurations and high levels of Platinum metals; the final system is a compact, scalable, flow-through, fully-integrated and engine-managed aftertreatment system capable of commercial application for Light Duty Vehicles and Trucks. NOx adsorber/particulate filter technology is particularly attractive for Light Duty applications due to the lower exhaust flow and temperature requirements as compared to Heavy Duty engines. Despite these strong positive aspects, NOx Adsorbers are challenged by their regeneration requirements and susceptibility to sulfur poisoning and thermal degradation. Capability was developed to regenerate the NOx Adsorber for NOx and SOx as well as the Particulate Filter for soot. This system was fully integrated into a truck and evaluated over the chassis dynamometer for emissions capability and in real-world winter field testing. Durability of the system was evaluated over a variety of accelerated and real-time dynamometer tests. Excellent NOx and PM conversion efficiency was demonstrated, even following 3000 hrs of endurance testing. Unregulated emissions emitted by the system were evaluated as was the fuel penalty associated with the DeNOx and DeSOx regeneration processes. In the final evaluation, the system demonstrated 90% NOx conversion and 99% PM conversion at a 6% fuel penalty over the FTP-75 test cycle. While target fuel penalty levels were demonstrated using full-bypass configuration systems, the cost associated with those systems was prohibitively high and would preclude successful commercialization of the technology. Although the flow-through configuration fell 1% short of the 5% fuel penalty target, the cost of this configuration is such that commercial application is feasible. Cost drivers for the final system configuration were identified and demonstrate areas where future development areas could focus.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Cummins Engine Company
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
910123
DOE Contract Number:  
FC26-99EE50577
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; CATALYSTS; COMBUSTION; COMMERCIALIZATION; CONFIGURATION; DIESEL ENGINES; DYNAMOMETERS; EFFICIENCY; ENGINES; FUEL CONSUMPTION; OXIDATION; PARTICULATES; PLATINUM METALS; POISONING; REGENERATION; REGULATIONS; SOOT; SULFUR; TARGETS; TESTING; THERMAL DEGRADATION

Citation Formats

Lisa A. Prentiss. FreedomCAR - Aftertreatment Subsystem Development. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.2172/910123.
Lisa A. Prentiss. FreedomCAR - Aftertreatment Subsystem Development. United States. doi:10.2172/910123.
Lisa A. Prentiss. Fri . "FreedomCAR - Aftertreatment Subsystem Development". United States. doi:10.2172/910123. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/910123.
@article{osti_910123,
title = {FreedomCAR - Aftertreatment Subsystem Development},
author = {Lisa A. Prentiss},
abstractNote = {The primary objective of this program was to develop generic aftertreatment technologies applicable for LDV and LDT engines ranging from 55 kW to 200kW, to develop an optimized and integrated aftertreatment system for a LDT (Light Duty Truck) type vehicle, and to demonstrate the technology which will enable light duty diesel engines to meet Federal Tier II regulation with minimum impact on fuel economy. Specifically, the development targets for emissions reduction and fuel injection penalty are given below: (1) NOx conversion efficiency > 90% (hot), > 84% (combined); (2) PM conversion efficiency > 90% (hot), > 84% (combined); (3) Fuel penalty over FTP-75 Less than 5%; and (4) Fuel penalty at Cruise condition Less than 3%. Development of cost-effective, highly efficient diesel exhaust aftertreatment systems in combination with very low engine out emission combustion development are essential elements for realization of Federal Tier II emission standards for Light Duty Trucks and Vehicles. Evaluation of several aftertreatment technologies was completed as part of this program. A combination of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst, NOx Adsorbing Catalyst and Catalyzed Soot Filter was found to provide the levels of conversion efficiency required to achieve the emission targets. While early systems required relatively large catalyst volumes, external dosing, sulfur traps, full bypass configurations and high levels of Platinum metals; the final system is a compact, scalable, flow-through, fully-integrated and engine-managed aftertreatment system capable of commercial application for Light Duty Vehicles and Trucks. NOx adsorber/particulate filter technology is particularly attractive for Light Duty applications due to the lower exhaust flow and temperature requirements as compared to Heavy Duty engines. Despite these strong positive aspects, NOx Adsorbers are challenged by their regeneration requirements and susceptibility to sulfur poisoning and thermal degradation. Capability was developed to regenerate the NOx Adsorber for NOx and SOx as well as the Particulate Filter for soot. This system was fully integrated into a truck and evaluated over the chassis dynamometer for emissions capability and in real-world winter field testing. Durability of the system was evaluated over a variety of accelerated and real-time dynamometer tests. Excellent NOx and PM conversion efficiency was demonstrated, even following 3000 hrs of endurance testing. Unregulated emissions emitted by the system were evaluated as was the fuel penalty associated with the DeNOx and DeSOx regeneration processes. In the final evaluation, the system demonstrated 90% NOx conversion and 99% PM conversion at a 6% fuel penalty over the FTP-75 test cycle. While target fuel penalty levels were demonstrated using full-bypass configuration systems, the cost associated with those systems was prohibitively high and would preclude successful commercialization of the technology. Although the flow-through configuration fell 1% short of the 5% fuel penalty target, the cost of this configuration is such that commercial application is feasible. Cost drivers for the final system configuration were identified and demonstrate areas where future development areas could focus.},
doi = {10.2172/910123},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2005},
month = {9}
}