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Title: Isolation and Characterization of a Geobacillus thermoleovorans Strain from an Ultra-Deep South African Gold Mine

Abstract

A thermophilic, facultative bacterium was isolated from a depth of 3.1 km below ground surface in an ultradeep gold mine in South Africa. This isolate, designated GE-7, was cultivated from pH 8.0, 600C fissure water. GE-7 grows optimally at 650C, pH 6.5 on a wide range of carbon substrates including GE-7 is a long rod-shaped bacterium (4-6 µm long x 0.5 wide) with terminal endospores and flagella, in addition to O2, can also utilize nitrate as an electron acceptor. Phylogenetic analysis of GE-7 16S rDNA sequence revealed high sequence similarity with G. thermoleovorans DSM 5366T (99.6%), however, certain phenotypic characteristics of GE-7 were distinct from this and other strains of G. thermoleovorans previously described.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
909231
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-54449
KP1504010; TRN: US200722%%1044
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Systematic and Applied Microbiology, 30(2):152-164; Journal Volume: 30; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; SOUTH AFRICA; GOLD ORES; MINES; BACILLUS; DNA SEQUENCING; BATCH CULTURE; Geobacillus thermoleovorans, extremophiles, thermophilic bacilli, lipase, deep subsurface bacteria

Citation Formats

Deflaun, Mary F., Fredrickson, Jim K., Dong, Hailiang, Pfiffner, Susan M., Onstott, T. C., Balkwill, David L., Streger, Sheryl H., Stackebrandt, E., Knoessen, S., and van Heerden, E. Isolation and Characterization of a Geobacillus thermoleovorans Strain from an Ultra-Deep South African Gold Mine. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.syapm.2006.04.003.
Deflaun, Mary F., Fredrickson, Jim K., Dong, Hailiang, Pfiffner, Susan M., Onstott, T. C., Balkwill, David L., Streger, Sheryl H., Stackebrandt, E., Knoessen, S., & van Heerden, E. Isolation and Characterization of a Geobacillus thermoleovorans Strain from an Ultra-Deep South African Gold Mine. United States. doi:10.1016/j.syapm.2006.04.003.
Deflaun, Mary F., Fredrickson, Jim K., Dong, Hailiang, Pfiffner, Susan M., Onstott, T. C., Balkwill, David L., Streger, Sheryl H., Stackebrandt, E., Knoessen, S., and van Heerden, E. Thu . "Isolation and Characterization of a Geobacillus thermoleovorans Strain from an Ultra-Deep South African Gold Mine". United States. doi:10.1016/j.syapm.2006.04.003.
@article{osti_909231,
title = {Isolation and Characterization of a Geobacillus thermoleovorans Strain from an Ultra-Deep South African Gold Mine},
author = {Deflaun, Mary F. and Fredrickson, Jim K. and Dong, Hailiang and Pfiffner, Susan M. and Onstott, T. C. and Balkwill, David L. and Streger, Sheryl H. and Stackebrandt, E. and Knoessen, S. and van Heerden, E.},
abstractNote = {A thermophilic, facultative bacterium was isolated from a depth of 3.1 km below ground surface in an ultradeep gold mine in South Africa. This isolate, designated GE-7, was cultivated from pH 8.0, 600C fissure water. GE-7 grows optimally at 650C, pH 6.5 on a wide range of carbon substrates including GE-7 is a long rod-shaped bacterium (4-6 µm long x 0.5 wide) with terminal endospores and flagella, in addition to O2, can also utilize nitrate as an electron acceptor. Phylogenetic analysis of GE-7 16S rDNA sequence revealed high sequence similarity with G. thermoleovorans DSM 5366T (99.6%), however, certain phenotypic characteristics of GE-7 were distinct from this and other strains of G. thermoleovorans previously described.},
doi = {10.1016/j.syapm.2006.04.003},
journal = {Systematic and Applied Microbiology, 30(2):152-164},
number = 2,
volume = 30,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 08 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 08 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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