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Title: The Effect of Diluent Gases In The Shock Tube and Rapid Compression Machine

Abstract

Studying the details of hydrocarbon chemistry in an internal combustion engine is not straightforward. A number of factors, including varying conditions of temperature and pressure, complex fluid motions, as well as variation in the composition of gasoline, render a meaningful characterization of the combusting system difficult. Some simplified experimental laboratory devices offer an alternative to complex engine environments: they remove some of the complexities that exist in real engines but retain the ability to work under engine-relevant conditions. The choice of simplified experimental devices is limited by the range of temperature and pressure at which they can operate; only the shock tube and rapid compression machine (RCM) can reach engine-relevant temperatures and pressures quickly enough and yet withstand the high pressures that occur after the ignition event. Both devices, however, suffer a common drawback: the use of inert diluent gases has been shown to affect the measured ignition delay time under some experimental conditions. Interestingly, this effect appears to be opposite in the shock tube and RCM: in the comparative study of the carrier gases argon and nitrogen, argon decreases the ignition delay time in the shock tube, but increases it in the RCM. This observation is investigated in moremore » detail in this study.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
908115
Report Number(s):
UCRL-CONF-228018
TRN: US200722%%440
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at: 5th U.S. National Combustion Meeting, San Diego, CA, United States, Mar 25 - Mar 28, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ARGON; CHEMISTRY; COMBUSTION; COMPRESSION; ENGINES; GASES; GASOLINE; HYDROCARBONS; IGNITION; INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES; NITROGEN; SHOCK TUBES; SOLVENTS

Citation Formats

Silke, E, W?rmel, J, O?Conaire, M, Simmie, J, and Curran, H. The Effect of Diluent Gases In The Shock Tube and Rapid Compression Machine. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Silke, E, W?rmel, J, O?Conaire, M, Simmie, J, & Curran, H. The Effect of Diluent Gases In The Shock Tube and Rapid Compression Machine. United States.
Silke, E, W?rmel, J, O?Conaire, M, Simmie, J, and Curran, H. Fri . "The Effect of Diluent Gases In The Shock Tube and Rapid Compression Machine". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/908115.
@article{osti_908115,
title = {The Effect of Diluent Gases In The Shock Tube and Rapid Compression Machine},
author = {Silke, E and W?rmel, J and O?Conaire, M and Simmie, J and Curran, H},
abstractNote = {Studying the details of hydrocarbon chemistry in an internal combustion engine is not straightforward. A number of factors, including varying conditions of temperature and pressure, complex fluid motions, as well as variation in the composition of gasoline, render a meaningful characterization of the combusting system difficult. Some simplified experimental laboratory devices offer an alternative to complex engine environments: they remove some of the complexities that exist in real engines but retain the ability to work under engine-relevant conditions. The choice of simplified experimental devices is limited by the range of temperature and pressure at which they can operate; only the shock tube and rapid compression machine (RCM) can reach engine-relevant temperatures and pressures quickly enough and yet withstand the high pressures that occur after the ignition event. Both devices, however, suffer a common drawback: the use of inert diluent gases has been shown to affect the measured ignition delay time under some experimental conditions. Interestingly, this effect appears to be opposite in the shock tube and RCM: in the comparative study of the carrier gases argon and nitrogen, argon decreases the ignition delay time in the shock tube, but increases it in the RCM. This observation is investigated in more detail in this study.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 09 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Feb 09 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • The diluent gas used in the preparation of test fuel/oxygen mixtures is inert and does not take part in the chemical reaction. However, it does have an effect on the measured ignition delay time both in rapid compression machines and in shock tubes - argon decelerates ignition in the RCM, but accelerates it in the shock tube under some conditions. This opposite effect is due to the times scales involved in these experimental devices. Typical ignition delay times in the RCM are in the region of 1-200 ms, while those in the shock tube are much shorter (10-1000 {mu}s). Comparativemore » RCM experiments and simulations for helium, argon, xenon, and nitrogen have shown extreme heat loss in the postcompression period, particularly for helium. Autoignition measurements of 2,3-dimethylpentane have highlighted a direct dependency of ignition delay time on the type of diluent used, where longer ignition delay time were recorded with argon. This increased ignition delay time is due to the extreme cooling of argon in the postcompression period. This observation was strengthened by comparative experiments with helium and argon, where the diluent effect was even stronger for helium, caused by its higher thermal conductivity. In the shock tube, the diluent effect is opposite to that in the RCM. For dilute mixtures of isooctane, calculations have predicted that mixtures with argon will ignite faster than those with nitrogen, based on the relative heat capacities of the two diluent gases. Overall, we conclude that the choice of diluent gases in experimental devices must be made with care, as ignition delay times can depend strongly on the type of diluent gas used. (author)« less
  • The characteristics of diesel spray and flame in a quiescent atmosphere were studied as a function of injection pressure ranging from 30 to 110 MPa. Measurements included the spray form and Sauter mean diameter of a non-evaporating spray, the liquid phase penetration of an evaporating spray and the visualization of sooting zone in a flame. Experimental results show that high pressure injection improves the atomization and air entrainment of non-evaporating spray and that the liquid phase penetration of evaporating spray is hardly affected by injection pressure, demonstrating a promotion of evaporation with injection pressure. Visualization of the sooting zone inmore » a flame made it clear that high pressure injection is advantageous in reducing soot formation and shortening the combustion duration.« less
  • The ignition of iso-octane/air and iso-octane/O{sub 2}/Ar ({proportional_to}20% O{sub 2}) mixtures was studied in a shock tube at temperatures of 868-1300 K, pressures of 7-58 atm, and equivalence ratios {phi}=1.0, 0.5, and 0.25. Ignition times were determined using endwall OH* emission and sidewall piezoelectric pressure measurements. Measured iso-octane/air ignition times agreed well with the previously published results. Mixtures with argon as the diluent exhibited ignition times 20% shorter, for most conditions, than those with nitrogen as the diluent (iso-octane/air mixtures). The difference in measured ignition times for mixtures containing argon and nitrogen as the diluent gas can be attributed tomore » the differing heat capacities of the two diluent species and the level of induction period heat release prior to ignition. Kinetic model predictions of ignition time from three mechanisms are compared to the experimental data. The mechanisms overpredict the ignition times but accurately capture the influence of diluent gas on iso-octane ignition time, indicating that the mechanisms predict an appropriate amount of induction period heat release. (author)« less
  • Photographic and performance studies with a Rapid Compression Machine at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have been used to develop insight into the role of mixing in diesel engine combustion. Combustion photographs and performance data were analyzed. The experiments simulate a single fuel spray in an open chember diesel engine with direct injection. The effects of droplet formation and evaporation on mixing are examined. It is concluded that mixing is controlled by the rate of entrainment of air by the fuel spray rather than the dynamics of single droplets. Experimental data on the geometry of a jet in a quiescentmore » combustion chamber were compared with a two-phase jet model; a jet model based on empirical turbulent entrainment coefficients was developed to predict the motion of a fuel jet in a combustion chamber with swirl. Good agreement between theory and experiment was obtained. The fuel and air mixing rate was estimated from the jet models and compared with combustion rates measured in the Rapid Compression Machine.« less