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Title: Editorial: Acid precipitation

Abstract

This editorial focuses on acid rain and the history of public and governmental response to acid rain. Comments on a book by Gwineth Howell `Acid Rain and Acid Waters` are included. The editor feels that Howells has provide a service to the environmental scientific community, with a textbook useful to a range of people, as well as a call for decision makers to learn from the acid rain issue and use it as a model for more sweeping global environmental issues. A balance is needed among several parameters such as level of evidence, probability that the evidence will lead to a specific direction and the cost to the global community. 1 tab.

Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
90784
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environment International; Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: PBD: 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; ACID RAIN; POLITICAL ASPECTS; GLOBAL ASPECTS; ENVIRONMENT

Citation Formats

NONE. Editorial: Acid precipitation. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
NONE. Editorial: Acid precipitation. United States.
NONE. Fri . "Editorial: Acid precipitation". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_90784,
title = {Editorial: Acid precipitation},
author = {NONE},
abstractNote = {This editorial focuses on acid rain and the history of public and governmental response to acid rain. Comments on a book by Gwineth Howell `Acid Rain and Acid Waters` are included. The editor feels that Howells has provide a service to the environmental scientific community, with a textbook useful to a range of people, as well as a call for decision makers to learn from the acid rain issue and use it as a model for more sweeping global environmental issues. A balance is needed among several parameters such as level of evidence, probability that the evidence will lead to a specific direction and the cost to the global community. 1 tab.},
doi = {},
journal = {Environment International},
number = 4,
volume = 21,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1995},
month = {Fri Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1995}
}
  • An overview is presented of the history of the problem of acid rain. Lake and stream water are classified as sensitive to acid rain largely on the basis of buffering capacity of soils and geological substrate. Evidence for acid precipitation causing the acidification of lakes and streams on a regional basis is not conclusive. However, soil genesis and forest development can be acidifying processes in humid climates. Acid rain is increasing soil aluminum solubility and leaching to surface water in concentrations toxic to fish. Under natural conditions of podzolization, aluminum is mobilized in surface soils and subsequently retained by spodicmore » subsoils. Whether acid rain appreciably accelerates aluminum leaching from soils is hypothetical. It is concluded from one report that acid precipitation is related to increases in the accumulation and spatial variations of forest floors, soil acidification, exchangeable aluminum, aluminum released from clay, and internal ecosystem H/sup +/ ion production. But, these conclusions are based on limited sampling. 28 references.« less
  • The author criticizes the fact that some soil scientists have difficulties in accepting that lakes and stream waters have become acid due to acid rain, because the natural production of acidity in ecosystems is large compared to the contribution from acid rain. He points out that Richter concludes that many of the reported changes, where real, may well result from natural processes with relatively minor contributions from acid precipitation. The author also disagrees with Krug and Frink who recently suggested that SO/sub 4/ from acid rain is exchanged with organic anions originally present in the water, leaving pH essentially unchanged.more » The author rebuts Henriksen who he says appears to have misunderstood the intent of the original correspondence, which was not to document evidence but rather to assert two generalities; (1) adverse effects of acid deposition on ecosystems are commonly overstated, and (2) the biogeochemistry of ecosystems is easily oversimplified, and natural sources of acidity are often ignored.« less
  • In this reply to a letter the author clarifies the intent of his original document which was not to document evidence but rather to assert two generalities: adverse effects of acid deposition on ecosystems are commonly overstated; the biogeochemistry of ecosystems is easily oversimplified, and natural sources of acidity are often ignored. 1 table, 34 references.
  • This discussion is a rebuttal to A. Henriken's critique of the authors original correspondence regarding acid rain. The author states that Henriksen appears to have misunderstood the intent of his original correspondence, which was not to document evidence but rather to assert two generalities: 1) Adverse effects of acid deposition on ecosystems are commonly overstated. 2) The biogeochemistry of ecosystems is easily oversimplified, and natural sources of acidity are often ignored.
  • This is a pair of articles to be used as the cover editorials for a special edition of the Journal of Educational Resources in Computing (JERIC) Special Edition on Resources for the Computer Security and Information Assurance Curriculum, volumes 1 and 2.