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Title: Lethality Effects of a High-Power Solid-State Laser

Abstract

We study the material interactions of a 25-kW solid-state laser, in experiments characterized by relatively large spot size sizes ({approx}3 cm) and the presence of airflow. The targets are 1-cm slabs of iron or aluminum. In the experiments with iron, we show that combustion plays an important role in heating the material. In the experiments with aluminum, there is a narrow range of intensities within which the material interactions vary from no melting at all to complete melt-through. A paint layer serves to increase the absorption. We explain these effects and incorporate them into a comprehensive computational model.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
902884
Report Number(s):
UCRL-CONF-229010
TRN: US200718%%328
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at: Directed Energy Symposium, Monterey, CA, United States, Mar 18 - Mar 23, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; ABSORPTION; ALUMINIUM; COMBUSTION; HEATING; IRON; MELTING; SOLID STATE LASERS; TARGETS

Citation Formats

Boley, C, Fochs, S, and Rubenchik, A. Lethality Effects of a High-Power Solid-State Laser. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Boley, C, Fochs, S, & Rubenchik, A. Lethality Effects of a High-Power Solid-State Laser. United States.
Boley, C, Fochs, S, and Rubenchik, A. Wed . "Lethality Effects of a High-Power Solid-State Laser". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/902884.
@article{osti_902884,
title = {Lethality Effects of a High-Power Solid-State Laser},
author = {Boley, C and Fochs, S and Rubenchik, A},
abstractNote = {We study the material interactions of a 25-kW solid-state laser, in experiments characterized by relatively large spot size sizes ({approx}3 cm) and the presence of airflow. The targets are 1-cm slabs of iron or aluminum. In the experiments with iron, we show that combustion plays an important role in heating the material. In the experiments with aluminum, there is a narrow range of intensities within which the material interactions vary from no melting at all to complete melt-through. A paint layer serves to increase the absorption. We explain these effects and incorporate them into a comprehensive computational model.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 07 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Wed Mar 07 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • We study the material interactions of a 25-kW solid-state laser, in experiments characterized by relatively large spot sizes ({approx}3 cm) and the presence of airflow. The targets are iron or aluminum slabs, of thickness 1 cm. In the experiments with iron, we show that combustion plays an important role in heating the material. In the experiments with aluminum, there is a narrow range of intensities within which the material interactions vary from no melting at all to complete melt-through. A layer of paint serves to increase the absorption. We explain these effects and incorporate them into a comprehensive computational model.
  • We have studied the use of a solid-state heat-capacity laser (SSHCL) in mortar defense. This type of laser, as built at LLNL, produces high-energy pulses with a wavelength of about 1 {micro}m and a pulse repetition rate of 200 Hz. Currently, the average power is about 26 kW. Our model of target interactions includes optical absorption, two-dimensional heat transport in the metal casing and explosive, melting, wind effects (cooling and melt removal), high-explosive reactions, and mortar rotation. The simulations continue until HE initiation is reached. We first calculate the initiation time for a range of powers on target and spotmore » sizes. Then we consider an engagement geometry in which a mortar is fired at an asset defended by a 100-kW SSHCL. Propagation effects such as diffraction, turbulent broadening, scattering, and absorption are calculated for points on the trajectory, by means of a validated model. We obtain kill times and fluences, as functions of the rotation rate. These appear quite feasible.« less
  • The power conditioning system for the High Average Power Laser program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is described. The system has been operational for two years. It is high voltage, high power, fault protected, and solid state. The power conditioning system drives flashlamps that pump solid state lasers. Flashlamps are driven by silicon control rectifier (SCR) switched, resonant charged, (LC) discharge pulse forming networks (PFNs). The system uses fiber optics for control and diagnostics. Energy and thermal diagnostics are monitored by computers.
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