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Title: GRBs from the First Stars

Abstract

We present an estimate of the Gamma Ray Bursts which should be expected from metal-free, elusive first generation of stars known as PopulationIII (PopIII). We derive the GRB rate from these stars from the Stellar Formation Rate obtained in several Reionization scenarios available in the literature. In all of the analyzed models we find that GRBs from PopIII are subdominant with respect to the ''standard'' (PopII) ones up to z {approx} 10.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
902481
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-12457
TRN: US200717%%321
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at 1st GLAST Symposium, Stanford, Palo Alto, 5-8 Feb 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; COSMIC GAMMA BURSTS; STAR EVOLUTION; NUCLEOSYNTHESIS; Astrophysics,ASTRO

Citation Formats

Iocco, Fabio, and /Naples U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park. GRBs from the First Stars. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Iocco, Fabio, & /Naples U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park. GRBs from the First Stars. United States.
Iocco, Fabio, and /Naples U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park. Mon . "GRBs from the First Stars". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/902481.
@article{osti_902481,
title = {GRBs from the First Stars},
author = {Iocco, Fabio and /Naples U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park},
abstractNote = {We present an estimate of the Gamma Ray Bursts which should be expected from metal-free, elusive first generation of stars known as PopulationIII (PopIII). We derive the GRB rate from these stars from the Stellar Formation Rate obtained in several Reionization scenarios available in the literature. In all of the analyzed models we find that GRBs from PopIII are subdominant with respect to the ''standard'' (PopII) ones up to z {approx} 10.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 16 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 16 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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