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Title: Band-to-Band and Sub-Band Gap Cathodoluminescence from GaAsP/GainP Epistructures Grown on GaAs Substrates

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
902470
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Luminescence; Journal Volume: 122-123; Journal Issue: 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Solar Energy - Photovoltaics

Citation Formats

Gfroerer, T. H., Romero, M. J., Al-Jassim, M. M., and Wanlass, M. W. Band-to-Band and Sub-Band Gap Cathodoluminescence from GaAsP/GainP Epistructures Grown on GaAs Substrates. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jlumin.2006.01.177.
Gfroerer, T. H., Romero, M. J., Al-Jassim, M. M., & Wanlass, M. W. Band-to-Band and Sub-Band Gap Cathodoluminescence from GaAsP/GainP Epistructures Grown on GaAs Substrates. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jlumin.2006.01.177.
Gfroerer, T. H., Romero, M. J., Al-Jassim, M. M., and Wanlass, M. W. Mon . "Band-to-Band and Sub-Band Gap Cathodoluminescence from GaAsP/GainP Epistructures Grown on GaAs Substrates". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jlumin.2006.01.177.
@article{osti_902470,
title = {Band-to-Band and Sub-Band Gap Cathodoluminescence from GaAsP/GainP Epistructures Grown on GaAs Substrates},
author = {Gfroerer, T. H. and Romero, M. J. and Al-Jassim, M. M. and Wanlass, M. W.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.jlumin.2006.01.177},
journal = {Journal of Luminescence},
number = 2007,
volume = 122-123,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • The band gap and microstructure of Ga[sub 0.5]In[sub 0.5]P have been shown to vary with deposition conditions. However, growth on (511)[ital B] GaAs substrates has been reported to give Ga[sub 0.5]In[sub 0.5]P with band gaps close to that of disordered material. It is shown here, that with appropriate selection of the growth parameters, Ga[sub 0.5]In[sub 0.5]P can be grown with low band gap and significant ordering on even the (511)[ital B] substrates, implying that surface steps play an important role in the ordering process. For the lattice-matched composition, a band gap of 1.83 eV was obtained using low growth temperaturemore » (575 [degree]C), low growth rate (0.55 [mu]m/h), and high phosphine pressure (5 Torr).« less
  • Pressure-dependent photoluminescence (PL) in several GaInP(ordered)-GaAs quantum well structures grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy is reported. Quantum well emission from GaAs is observed only in structures where thin ({approximately}2nm) GaP layers are inserted between the GaAs well and the GaInP barrier. By extrapolating the energies of the various inter and intralayer PL transitions observed under pressures (up to 5.5 GPa) to zero pressure, the different band offsets of the heterostructure have been determined. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}
  • By gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy, we obtained a device-quality GaInP epitaxial layer lattice matched to (100)-GaAs substrates, with a photoluminescence efficiency comparable to that of a crystal grown by liquid-phase epitaxy. A GaInP/AlInP double heterostructure laser with a GaInP active layer was fabricated, and pulsed lasing operation was achieved at room temperature for, we believe, the first time.
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