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Title: Taiwan industrial cooperation program technology transfer for low-level radioactive waste final disposal - phase I.

Abstract

Sandia National Laboratories and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan have collaborated in a technology transfer program related to low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal in Taiwan. Phase I of this program included regulatory analysis of LLW final disposal, development of LLW disposal performance assessment capabilities, and preliminary performance assessments of two potential disposal sites. Performance objectives were based on regulations in Taiwan and comparisons to those in the United States. Probabilistic performance assessment models were constructed based on limited site data using software including GoldSim, BLT-MS, FEHM, and HELP. These software codes provided the probabilistic framework, container degradation, waste-form leaching, groundwater flow, radionuclide transport, and cover infiltration simulation capabilities in the performance assessment. Preliminary performance assessment analyses were conducted for a near-surface disposal system and a mined cavern disposal system at two representative sites in Taiwan. Results of example calculations indicate peak simulated concentrations to a receptor within a few hundred years of LLW disposal, primarily from highly soluble, non-sorbing radionuclides.

Authors:
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Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
900849
Report Number(s):
SAND2007-0131
TRN: US0702418
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; CONTAINERS; LEACHING; LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; NUCLEAR ENERGY; PERFORMANCE; RADIOISOTOPES; REGULATIONS; SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES; SIMULATION; TAIWAN; TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER; TRANSPORT; Technology transfer-International cooperation.; Low level radioactive wastes.; Performance assessment.; Spent fuels-Storage; Taiwan.

Citation Formats

Knowlton, Robert G., Cochran, John Russell, Arnold, Bill Walter, Jow, Hong-Nian, Mattie, Patrick D., Schelling, Frank Joseph Jr., and .). Taiwan industrial cooperation program technology transfer for low-level radioactive waste final disposal - phase I.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/900849.
Knowlton, Robert G., Cochran, John Russell, Arnold, Bill Walter, Jow, Hong-Nian, Mattie, Patrick D., Schelling, Frank Joseph Jr., & .). Taiwan industrial cooperation program technology transfer for low-level radioactive waste final disposal - phase I.. United States. doi:10.2172/900849.
Knowlton, Robert G., Cochran, John Russell, Arnold, Bill Walter, Jow, Hong-Nian, Mattie, Patrick D., Schelling, Frank Joseph Jr., and .). Mon . "Taiwan industrial cooperation program technology transfer for low-level radioactive waste final disposal - phase I.". United States. doi:10.2172/900849. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/900849.
@article{osti_900849,
title = {Taiwan industrial cooperation program technology transfer for low-level radioactive waste final disposal - phase I.},
author = {Knowlton, Robert G. and Cochran, John Russell and Arnold, Bill Walter and Jow, Hong-Nian and Mattie, Patrick D. and Schelling, Frank Joseph Jr. and .)},
abstractNote = {Sandia National Laboratories and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan have collaborated in a technology transfer program related to low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal in Taiwan. Phase I of this program included regulatory analysis of LLW final disposal, development of LLW disposal performance assessment capabilities, and preliminary performance assessments of two potential disposal sites. Performance objectives were based on regulations in Taiwan and comparisons to those in the United States. Probabilistic performance assessment models were constructed based on limited site data using software including GoldSim, BLT-MS, FEHM, and HELP. These software codes provided the probabilistic framework, container degradation, waste-form leaching, groundwater flow, radionuclide transport, and cover infiltration simulation capabilities in the performance assessment. Preliminary performance assessment analyses were conducted for a near-surface disposal system and a mined cavern disposal system at two representative sites in Taiwan. Results of example calculations indicate peak simulated concentrations to a receptor within a few hundred years of LLW disposal, primarily from highly soluble, non-sorbing radionuclides.},
doi = {10.2172/900849},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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  • With the passage of the Low-Level Waste Policy Act of 1980, the responsibility for providing facilities for the safe and efficient disposal of low-level waste has been placed upon the states. Most states have chosen to share the responsibility with neighboring states through the formation of regional interstate compacts. The compacts will differ in their functional authority; some will merely assist the member states and others will act as a regional government in the area of LLW management. In all regional arrangements, an individual state will be required to host the regional disposal facility. As a result, multiplicity of entitiesmore » will be involved each of which will have its own operating approach and practices. It is important, therefore, that guidelines be developed that enable each participant to adopt procedures tailored to meet particular needs but which form a common basis of practice. The purpose of differences in the procedures employed by the various entities can be readily understood and not allowed to cause confusion and delay. With the publication on December 27, 1982, by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission of final rules on Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste (10 CFR 61), it is now possible to factor these requirements into such guidelines. This report has been prepared with that objective in mind. Contents of this report include: guidelines for siting LLW disposal facilities; life cycle of an LLW disposal facility; siting procedures; and role of compact commissions. 4 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.« less
  • This document was prepared to increase understanding of compensation and incentives as they pertain to the siting of Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities. Compensation and incentives are discussed as methods to facilitate siting Low-Level Radioactive Waste Facilities. Compensations may be in the form of grants to enable host communities to evaluate potential impacts of the proposed facility. Compensations may also include reimbursements to the host community for costs incurred during facility construction, operation and closure. These may include required improvements to local roads, new equipment, and payments for revenue losses in local property taxes when disposal sites are removed frommore » the tax base. Incentives provide benefits to the community beyond the costs directly related to the operation of the facility. Greater local control over waste facilities can be a powerful incentive. Local officials may be more willing to accept a facility if they have some control over the operation and monitoring associated with the facility. Failure to secure new disposal sites may cause such problems as illegal dumping which would create public health hazards. Also, lack of disposal capacity may restrict research and medical use of radioactive materials. The use of compensation and incentives may increase acceptance of communities for hosting a low-level waste disposal facility.« less
  • This document evaluates the feasibility of co-disposing of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) special case waste (SCW). This document: (1) Discusses and evaluates key issues concerning co-disposal of GTCC LLW with SCW. This includes examining these issues in terms of regulatory concerns, technical feasibility, and economics; (2) Examines advantages and disadvantages of such co-disposal; and (3) Makes recommendations. Research and analysis of the issues presented in this report indicate that it would be technically and economically feasible to co-dispose of GTCC LLW with DOE SCW. However, a dilemma will likely arise inmore » the current division of regulatory responsibilities between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and DOE (i.e., current requirement for disposal of GTCC LLW in a facility licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission). DOE SCW is currently not subject to this licensing requirement.« less