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Title: Toxicity of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Human Lung Cancer Cells

Abstract

With the fast development of nanotechnology, the nanomaterials start to cause people's attention for potential toxic effect. In this paper, the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress caused by 20-nm cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles in cultured human lung cancer cells was investigated. The sulforhodamine B method was employed to assess cell viability after exposure to 3.5, 10.5, and 23.3 μg/ml of CeO2 nanoparticles for 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability decreased significantly as a function of nanoparticle dose and exposure time. Indicators of oxidative stress and cytotoxicity, including total reactive oxygen species, glutathione, malondialdehyde, α-tocopherol, and lactate dehydrogenase, were quantitatively assessed. It is concluded from the results that free radicals generated by exposure to 3.5 to 23.3 μg/ml CeO2 nanoparticles produce significant oxidative stress in the cells, as reflected by reduced glutathione and α-tocopherol levels; the toxic effects of CeO2 nanoparticles are dose dependent and time dependent; elevated oxidative stress increases the production of malondialdehyde and lactate dehydrogenase, which are indicators of lipid peroxidation and cell membrane damage, respectively.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
899815
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-53708
TRN: US200708%%546
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Toxicology, 25(6):451-457
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; CELL MEMBRANES; CERIUM OXIDES; GLUTATHIONE; LACTATE DEHYDROGENASE; LIPIDS; LUNGS; NEOPLASMS; OXYGEN; PRODUCTION; RADICALS; TOXICITY; VIABILITY; cerium oxide; cytotoxicity; lung cancer cells; nanoparticles; oxidative stress

Citation Formats

Weisheng, Lin, Huang, Yue-wern, Zhou, Xiao Dong, and Ma, Yinfa. Toxicity of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Human Lung Cancer Cells. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1080/10915810600959543.
Weisheng, Lin, Huang, Yue-wern, Zhou, Xiao Dong, & Ma, Yinfa. Toxicity of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Human Lung Cancer Cells. United States. doi:10.1080/10915810600959543.
Weisheng, Lin, Huang, Yue-wern, Zhou, Xiao Dong, and Ma, Yinfa. Sun . "Toxicity of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Human Lung Cancer Cells". United States. doi:10.1080/10915810600959543.
@article{osti_899815,
title = {Toxicity of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Human Lung Cancer Cells},
author = {Weisheng, Lin and Huang, Yue-wern and Zhou, Xiao Dong and Ma, Yinfa},
abstractNote = {With the fast development of nanotechnology, the nanomaterials start to cause people's attention for potential toxic effect. In this paper, the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress caused by 20-nm cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles in cultured human lung cancer cells was investigated. The sulforhodamine B method was employed to assess cell viability after exposure to 3.5, 10.5, and 23.3 μg/ml of CeO2 nanoparticles for 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability decreased significantly as a function of nanoparticle dose and exposure time. Indicators of oxidative stress and cytotoxicity, including total reactive oxygen species, glutathione, malondialdehyde, α-tocopherol, and lactate dehydrogenase, were quantitatively assessed. It is concluded from the results that free radicals generated by exposure to 3.5 to 23.3 μg/ml CeO2 nanoparticles produce significant oxidative stress in the cells, as reflected by reduced glutathione and α-tocopherol levels; the toxic effects of CeO2 nanoparticles are dose dependent and time dependent; elevated oxidative stress increases the production of malondialdehyde and lactate dehydrogenase, which are indicators of lipid peroxidation and cell membrane damage, respectively.},
doi = {10.1080/10915810600959543},
journal = {International Journal of Toxicology, 25(6):451-457},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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