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Title: Subject Responses to Electrochromic Windows

Abstract

Forty-three subjects worked in a private office with switchable electrochromic windows, manually-operated Venetian blinds, and dimmable fluorescent lights. The electrochromic window had a visible transmittance range of approximately 3-60%. Analysis of subject responses and physical data collected during the work sessions showed that the electrochromic windows reduced the incidence of glare compared to working under a fixed transmittance (60%) condition. Subjects used the Venetian blinds less often and preferred the variable transmittance condition, but used slightly more electric lighting with it than they did when window transmittance was fixed.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE. Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency andRenewable Energy. Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for TechnologyDevelopment. Office of the Building Technologies Program. State andCommunity Programs. Office of the Building Research andStandards
OSTI Identifier:
898558
Report Number(s):
LBNL-57125
Journal ID: ISSN 0378-7788; ENEBDR; R&D Project: 677628; BnR: BT0304030; TRN: US200706%%36
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy and Buildings; Journal Volume: 38; Journal Issue: 7; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 2005
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; WINDOWS; OFFICE BUILDINGS; ELECTROCHROMISM; LIGHTING SYSTEMS; HUMAN POPULATIONS; BEHAVIOR

Citation Formats

Clear, Robert, Inkarojrit, Vorapat, and Lee, Eleanor. Subject Responses to Electrochromic Windows. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2006.03.011.
Clear, Robert, Inkarojrit, Vorapat, & Lee, Eleanor. Subject Responses to Electrochromic Windows. United States. doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2006.03.011.
Clear, Robert, Inkarojrit, Vorapat, and Lee, Eleanor. 2006. "Subject Responses to Electrochromic Windows". United States. doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2006.03.011. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/898558.
@article{osti_898558,
title = {Subject Responses to Electrochromic Windows},
author = {Clear, Robert and Inkarojrit, Vorapat and Lee, Eleanor},
abstractNote = {Forty-three subjects worked in a private office with switchable electrochromic windows, manually-operated Venetian blinds, and dimmable fluorescent lights. The electrochromic window had a visible transmittance range of approximately 3-60%. Analysis of subject responses and physical data collected during the work sessions showed that the electrochromic windows reduced the incidence of glare compared to working under a fixed transmittance (60%) condition. Subjects used the Venetian blinds less often and preferred the variable transmittance condition, but used slightly more electric lighting with it than they did when window transmittance was fixed.},
doi = {10.1016/j.enbuild.2006.03.011},
journal = {Energy and Buildings},
number = 7,
volume = 38,
place = {United States},
year = 2006,
month = 3
}
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