skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Geometry Description Markup Language for Physics Simulation And Analysis Applications.

Abstract

The Geometry Description Markup Language (GDML) is a specialized XML-based language designed as an application-independent persistent format for describing the geometries of detectors associated with physics measurements. It serves to implement ''geometry trees'' which correspond to the hierarchy of volumes a detector geometry can be composed of, and to allow to identify the position of individual solids, as well as to describe the materials they are made of. Being pure XML, GDML can be universally used, and in particular it can be considered as the format for interchanging geometries among different applications. In this paper we will present the current status of the development of GDML. After having discussed the contents of the latest GDML schema, which is the basic definition of the format, we will concentrate on the GDML processors. We will present the latest implementation of the GDML ''writers'' as well as ''readers'' for either Geant4 [2], [3] or ROOT [4], [10].

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
898153
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-12301
TRN: US200706%%402
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IEEE Trans.Nucl.Sci.53:2892, 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; G CODES; GEOMETRY; IMPLEMENTATION; PHYSICS; PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES; SIMULATION; Instrumentation,ACCPHY

Citation Formats

Chytracek, R., /CERN, McCormick, J., /SLAC, Pokorski, W., /CERN, Santin, G., and /European Space Agency. Geometry Description Markup Language for Physics Simulation And Analysis Applications.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Chytracek, R., /CERN, McCormick, J., /SLAC, Pokorski, W., /CERN, Santin, G., & /European Space Agency. Geometry Description Markup Language for Physics Simulation And Analysis Applications.. United States.
Chytracek, R., /CERN, McCormick, J., /SLAC, Pokorski, W., /CERN, Santin, G., and /European Space Agency. Tue . "Geometry Description Markup Language for Physics Simulation And Analysis Applications.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/898153.
@article{osti_898153,
title = {Geometry Description Markup Language for Physics Simulation And Analysis Applications.},
author = {Chytracek, R. and /CERN and McCormick, J. and /SLAC and Pokorski, W. and /CERN and Santin, G. and /European Space Agency},
abstractNote = {The Geometry Description Markup Language (GDML) is a specialized XML-based language designed as an application-independent persistent format for describing the geometries of detectors associated with physics measurements. It serves to implement ''geometry trees'' which correspond to the hierarchy of volumes a detector geometry can be composed of, and to allow to identify the position of individual solids, as well as to describe the materials they are made of. Being pure XML, GDML can be universally used, and in particular it can be considered as the format for interchanging geometries among different applications. In this paper we will present the current status of the development of GDML. After having discussed the contents of the latest GDML schema, which is the basic definition of the format, we will concentrate on the GDML processors. We will present the latest implementation of the GDML ''writers'' as well as ''readers'' for either Geant4 [2], [3] or ROOT [4], [10].},
doi = {},
journal = {IEEE Trans.Nucl.Sci.53:2892, 2006},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 23 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Tue Jan 23 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Background Multidisciplinary integrated research requires the ability to couple the diverse sets of data obtained from a range of complex experiments and computer simulations. Integrating data requires semantically rich information. In this paper the generation of semantically rich data from the NWChem computational chemistry software is discussed within the Chemical Markup Language (CML) framework. Results The NWChem computational chemistry software has been modified and coupled to the FoX library to write CML compliant XML data files. The FoX library was expanded to represent the lexical input files used by the computational chemistry software. Conclusions The production of CML compliant XMLmore » files for the computational chemistry software NWChem can be relatively easily accomplished using the FoX library. A unified computational chemistry or CompChem convention and dictionary needs to be developed through a community-based effort. The long-term goal is to enable a researcher to do Google-style chemistry and physics searches.« less
  • The high-level interactive mathematics and graphics computer language, Mathsy, is discussed and demonstrated with sample applications. Mathsy is an interpretive, interactive, mathematical, array processing, and graphics system. Among its diverse uses in the laser fusion project at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, it has enabled the conceptualization of a new algorithm to compute the density of electron or phonon states spectra which requires no root solving.
  • VAL is a high-level, function-based language designed for use on data flow computers. A data flow computer has many small processors organized to cooperate in the executive of a single computation. A computation is represented by its data flow graph; each operator in a graph is scheduled for execution on one of the processors after all of its operands' values are known. VAL promotes the indentification of concurrency in algorithms and simplifies the mapping into data graphs. This paper presents a detailed introduction to VAL and analyzes its usefulness for programming in a highly concurrent environment. VAL provides implicit concurrencymore » (operations that can execute simultaneously are evident without the need for any explicit language notation). The language uses function- and expression-based features that prohibit all side effects, which simplifies translation to graphs. The salient language features are described and illustrated through examples taken from a complete VAL program for adaptive quadrature. Analysis of the language shows that VAL meets the critical needs for a data flow environment. The language encourages programmers to think in terms of general concurrency, enhances readability (due to the absence of side effects), and possesses a structure amenable to verification techniques. However, VAL is still evolving. The language definition needs refining, and more support tools for programmer use need to be developed. Also, some new kinds of optimization problems should be addressed.« less