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Title: Income breeding allows an aquatic snake Seminatrix pygaea to reproduce normally following prolonged drought-induced aestivation

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL), Aiken, SC
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
897338
Report Number(s):
SREL 2985
TRN: US200704%%572
DOE Contract Number:
DE-FC09-07SR22506
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Animal Ecology; Journal Volume: 75
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BREEDING; HIBERNATION; DROUGHTS; SNAKES; REPRODUCTION

Citation Formats

Winne, C. T., J. D. Willson and J. W. Gibbons. Income breeding allows an aquatic snake Seminatrix pygaea to reproduce normally following prolonged drought-induced aestivation. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2656.2006.01159.x.
Winne, C. T., J. D. Willson and J. W. Gibbons. Income breeding allows an aquatic snake Seminatrix pygaea to reproduce normally following prolonged drought-induced aestivation. United States. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2656.2006.01159.x.
Winne, C. T., J. D. Willson and J. W. Gibbons. Sun . "Income breeding allows an aquatic snake Seminatrix pygaea to reproduce normally following prolonged drought-induced aestivation". United States. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2656.2006.01159.x.
@article{osti_897338,
title = {Income breeding allows an aquatic snake Seminatrix pygaea to reproduce normally following prolonged drought-induced aestivation},
author = {Winne, C. T., J. D. Willson and J. W. Gibbons},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {10.1111/j.1365-2656.2006.01159.x},
journal = {Journal of Animal Ecology},
number = ,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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    Cited by 11
  • Cited by 11