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Title: Proceedings of the 2005 International Linear Collider Workshop (LCWS05)

Abstract

Exploration of physics at the TeV scale holds the promise of addressing some of our most basic questions about the nature of matter, space, time, and energy. Discoveries of the Electroweak Symmetry Breaking mechanism, Supersymmetry, Extra Dimensions of space, Dark Matter particles, and new forces of nature are all possible. We have been waiting and planning for this exploration for over 20 years. In 2007 the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will begin its operation and will break into this new energy frontier. A new era of understanding will emerge as the LHC data maps out the Terascale. With the LHC discoveries, new compelling questions will arise. Responding to these questions will call for a new tool with greater sensitivity--the International Linear Collider. Historically, the most striking progress in the exploration of new energy frontiers has been made from combining results from hadron and electron-positron colliders. The precision measurements possible at the ILC will reveal the underlying theory which gave rise to the particles discovered at the LHC and will open the window to even higher energies. The world High Energy Physics community has reached an accord that an e+e- linear collider operating at 0.5-1.0 TeV would provide both uniquemore » and essential scientific opportunities; the community has endorsed with highest priority the construction of such a machine. A major milestone toward this goal was reached in August 2004 when the International Committee on Future Accelerators approved a recommendation for the technology of the future International Linear Collider. A global research and design effort is now underway to construct a global design report for the ILC. This endeavor is directed by Barry Barrish of the California Institute of Technology. The offer, made by Jonathan Dorfan on the behalf of ICFA, and acceptance of this directorship took place during the opening plenary session of this workshop. The 2005 International Linear Collider Workshop was held at Stanford University from 18 March through 22 March, 2005. This workshop was hosted by the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and sponsored by the World Wide Study for future e+e- linear colliders. It was the eighth in a series of International Workshops (the first was held in Saariselka, Finland in 1991) devoted to the physics and detectors associated with high energy e+e- linear colliders. 397 physicists from 24 countries participated in the workshop. These proceedings represent the presentations and discussions which took place during the workshop. The contributions are comprised of physics studies, detector specifications, and accelerator design for the ILC. These proceedings are organized in two Volumes and include contributions from both the plenary and parallel sessions.« less

Authors:
 [1];
  1. (ed.)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
896725
Report Number(s):
SLAC-R-772
TRN: US0700878
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: econf c050318; Conference: 2005 International Linear Collider Workshop (LCWS 2005) 18-22 Mar 2005, Stanford, California
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; CERN; CONSTRUCTION; DIMENSIONS; EXPLORATION; HADRONS; HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS; LINEAR COLLIDERS; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; PHYSICS; PLANNING; SAFETY REPORTS; SPECIFICATIONS; SUPERSYMMETRY; SYMMETRY BREAKING; Instrumentation,ACCPHY, ACCSYS

Citation Formats

Hewett, JoAnne,, and /SLAC. Proceedings of the 2005 International Linear Collider Workshop (LCWS05). United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Hewett, JoAnne,, & /SLAC. Proceedings of the 2005 International Linear Collider Workshop (LCWS05). United States.
Hewett, JoAnne,, and /SLAC. Mon . "Proceedings of the 2005 International Linear Collider Workshop (LCWS05)". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/896725.
@article{osti_896725,
title = {Proceedings of the 2005 International Linear Collider Workshop (LCWS05)},
author = {Hewett, JoAnne, and /SLAC},
abstractNote = {Exploration of physics at the TeV scale holds the promise of addressing some of our most basic questions about the nature of matter, space, time, and energy. Discoveries of the Electroweak Symmetry Breaking mechanism, Supersymmetry, Extra Dimensions of space, Dark Matter particles, and new forces of nature are all possible. We have been waiting and planning for this exploration for over 20 years. In 2007 the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will begin its operation and will break into this new energy frontier. A new era of understanding will emerge as the LHC data maps out the Terascale. With the LHC discoveries, new compelling questions will arise. Responding to these questions will call for a new tool with greater sensitivity--the International Linear Collider. Historically, the most striking progress in the exploration of new energy frontiers has been made from combining results from hadron and electron-positron colliders. The precision measurements possible at the ILC will reveal the underlying theory which gave rise to the particles discovered at the LHC and will open the window to even higher energies. The world High Energy Physics community has reached an accord that an e+e- linear collider operating at 0.5-1.0 TeV would provide both unique and essential scientific opportunities; the community has endorsed with highest priority the construction of such a machine. A major milestone toward this goal was reached in August 2004 when the International Committee on Future Accelerators approved a recommendation for the technology of the future International Linear Collider. A global research and design effort is now underway to construct a global design report for the ILC. This endeavor is directed by Barry Barrish of the California Institute of Technology. The offer, made by Jonathan Dorfan on the behalf of ICFA, and acceptance of this directorship took place during the opening plenary session of this workshop. The 2005 International Linear Collider Workshop was held at Stanford University from 18 March through 22 March, 2005. This workshop was hosted by the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and sponsored by the World Wide Study for future e+e- linear colliders. It was the eighth in a series of International Workshops (the first was held in Saariselka, Finland in 1991) devoted to the physics and detectors associated with high energy e+e- linear colliders. 397 physicists from 24 countries participated in the workshop. These proceedings represent the presentations and discussions which took place during the workshop. The contributions are comprised of physics studies, detector specifications, and accelerator design for the ILC. These proceedings are organized in two Volumes and include contributions from both the plenary and parallel sessions.},
doi = {},
journal = {econf c050318},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Dec 18 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Mon Dec 18 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • For two weeks in August of 2005, 668 physicists gathered in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado to study the physics, the detectors and the accelerator of the International Linear Collider. For the first time, a fully international physics and detector workshop was held in conjunction with the ILC Accelerator workshop.
  • In March 1981, the SLAC management, together with the SLAC users organization, invited interested physicists to a three day meeting to discuss the laboratory's plans and progress on the new colliding e/sup +/e/sup -/ machine - the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). Those attending were encouraged to join together to study the challenges and opportunities presented by the SLC. The study of the parameters for experiments on 100 GeV e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions, and the reviews of the state-of-the-art in the four areas of detector technology - Tracking, Calorimetry, Particle Identification and Electronics and Computing - were undertaken from a generalmore » standpoint, and not from the particular perspective of a specific experimental proposal. Nine sections were prepared separately for the data base.« less
  • The first day of the workshop was devoted to four plenary issues'' talks, one for each working group: Beam-Beam Interaction, Detector, Hardware, and Optical Design. The last day was devoted to plenary talks summarizing the activities of the working groups. Each of the three remaining days there,was a short morning plenary devoted to a brief summary of the preceding day and an announcement of planned working group discussions for that day. The transparencies for the issues'' and summary'' talks are included in this volume, along with some remarks from the working group chairpersons. Very briefly, the beam-beam group continued tomore » address the quantitative study of QED induced backgrounds, and attempted to better understand the nature and prevalence of QCD millijets. The detector group attempted to identify the impact on masking and detector design of the beam-beam backgrounds, the synchrotron radiation induced backgrounds from beam halos and muon backgrounds produced primarily in collimators. Nanosecond timing elements needed in conjunction with multi-bunch operation were discussed. The hardware group addressed the problem of magnet design and support, especially the final doublet magnets suspended within the detector environment, and instrumentation issues, such as high resolution beam position monitors. The optics group discussed new final focus system ideas, collimator design, and improvement of beamline tolerances. If you were not here to participate, we hope that this volume will help you in your orientation to these problems.« less
  • This report contains papers on the next-generation of linear colliders. The particular areas of discussion are: parameters; beam dynamics and wakefields; damping rings and sources; rf power sources; accelerator structures; instrumentation; final focus; and review of beam-beam interaction.
  • The first day of the workshop was devoted to four plenary ``issues`` talks, one for each working group: Beam-Beam Interaction, Detector, Hardware, and Optical Design. The last day was devoted to plenary talks summarizing the activities of the working groups. Each of the three remaining days there,was a short morning plenary devoted to a brief summary of the preceding day and an announcement of planned working group discussions for that day. The transparencies for the ``issues`` and ``summary`` talks are included in this volume, along with some remarks from the working group chairpersons. Very briefly, the beam-beam group continued tomore » address the quantitative study of QED induced backgrounds, and attempted to better understand the nature and prevalence of QCD millijets. The detector group attempted to identify the impact on masking and detector design of the beam-beam backgrounds, the synchrotron radiation induced backgrounds from beam halos and muon backgrounds produced primarily in collimators. Nanosecond timing elements needed in conjunction with multi-bunch operation were discussed. The hardware group addressed the problem of magnet design and support, especially the final doublet magnets suspended within the detector environment, and instrumentation issues, such as high resolution beam position monitors. The optics group discussed new final focus system ideas, collimator design, and improvement of beamline tolerances. If you were not here to participate, we hope that this volume will help you in your orientation to these problems.« less