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Title: Creating a fuels baseline and establishing fire frequency relationships to develop a landscape management strategy at the Savannah River Site.

Abstract

USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-41. pp 351-366. Abstract—The Savannah River Site is a Department of Energy Nuclear Defense Facility and a National Environmental Research Park located in the upper coastal plain of South Carolina. Prescribed burning is conducted on 15,000 to 20,000 ac annually. We modifi ed standard forest inventory methods to incorporate a complete assessment of fuel components on 622 plots, assessing coarse woody debris, ladder fuels, and the litter and duff layers. Because of deficiencies in south-wide data on litter-duff bulk densities, which are the fuels most often consumed in prescribed fires, we developed new bulk density relationships. Total surface fuel loading across the landscape ranged from 0.8 to 48.7 tons/ac. The variables basal area, stand age, and site index were important in accounting for variability in ladder fuel, coarse woody debris, and litter-duff for pine types. For a given pine stand condition, litter-duff loading decreased in direct proportion to the number of burns in the preceding thirty years. Ladder fuels for loblolly and longleaf increased in direct proportion to the years since the last prescribed burn. The pattern of fuel loading on the SRS reflects stand dynamics, stand management and fire management. It is suggested that themore » Forest Inventory and Analysis Program can easily modify sampling protocols to incorporate collection of fuels data.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - Office of Environmental Management (EM)
OSTI Identifier:
896219
Report Number(s):
na
06-15-P; TRN: US200721%%119
DOE Contract Number:
AI09-00SR22188
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-41.; Conference: Fuels Management - How to Measure Success, March 28-30, 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BULK DENSITY; FORESTS; MANAGEMENT; PINES; FORESTRY; FIRES; Fire; landscape management; Savannah River Site

Citation Formats

Parresol, Bernard R, Shea, Dan, and Ottmar, Roger. Creating a fuels baseline and establishing fire frequency relationships to develop a landscape management strategy at the Savannah River Site.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Parresol, Bernard R, Shea, Dan, & Ottmar, Roger. Creating a fuels baseline and establishing fire frequency relationships to develop a landscape management strategy at the Savannah River Site.. United States.
Parresol, Bernard R, Shea, Dan, and Ottmar, Roger. Wed . "Creating a fuels baseline and establishing fire frequency relationships to develop a landscape management strategy at the Savannah River Site.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/896219.
@article{osti_896219,
title = {Creating a fuels baseline and establishing fire frequency relationships to develop a landscape management strategy at the Savannah River Site.},
author = {Parresol, Bernard R and Shea, Dan and Ottmar, Roger},
abstractNote = {USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-41. pp 351-366. Abstract—The Savannah River Site is a Department of Energy Nuclear Defense Facility and a National Environmental Research Park located in the upper coastal plain of South Carolina. Prescribed burning is conducted on 15,000 to 20,000 ac annually. We modifi ed standard forest inventory methods to incorporate a complete assessment of fuel components on 622 plots, assessing coarse woody debris, ladder fuels, and the litter and duff layers. Because of deficiencies in south-wide data on litter-duff bulk densities, which are the fuels most often consumed in prescribed fires, we developed new bulk density relationships. Total surface fuel loading across the landscape ranged from 0.8 to 48.7 tons/ac. The variables basal area, stand age, and site index were important in accounting for variability in ladder fuel, coarse woody debris, and litter-duff for pine types. For a given pine stand condition, litter-duff loading decreased in direct proportion to the number of burns in the preceding thirty years. Ladder fuels for loblolly and longleaf increased in direct proportion to the years since the last prescribed burn. The pattern of fuel loading on the SRS reflects stand dynamics, stand management and fire management. It is suggested that the Forest Inventory and Analysis Program can easily modify sampling protocols to incorporate collection of fuels data.},
doi = {},
journal = {USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-41.},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
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  • This study evaluates modeled fire behavior for the Savannah River Site in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern U.S. using three data sources: FCCS, LANDFIRE, and SWRA. The Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS) was used to build fuelbeds from intensive field sampling of 629 plots. Custom fire behavior fuel models were derived from these fuelbeds. LANDFIRE developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy attributes for the U.S. using satellite imagery informed by field data. The Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment (SWRA) developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy cover for the southeastern U.S. using satellite imagery.
  • The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) nearing completion at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is the lead installation in the US Department of Energy program for ending interim storage and achieving permanent disposal of large quantities of defense high-level nuclear wastes in the United States. At projected processing rates, the DWPF will convert the existing SRS inventory of aqueous high-level wastes to solid glass form in steel canisters in about 20 years, with process adjustments required in a terminal campaign to handle residual waste components. Following completion of the existing inventory workoff, significantly modified facilities and procedures will be neededmore » to accommodate the down-size waste output of a single reactor (NPR) operation. The SRS program at this time, in contrast to the other defense waste as well as commercial waste programs, will be dominated by requirements of a small-scale technology, suitable for processing low volumes of wastes as-generated in relatively high-activity form. 19 refs.« less
  • The purpose of this paper is to communicate how new and established management techniques are applied to environmental restoration projects at the Savannah River Site. Specifically, the paper discusses application of four (4) management approaches: Total Quality Principles; Task Team Structure; Cost Time Management; SAFER (Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration). The objective is to share Savannah River Site experience and document case studies where certain approaches have enhanced projects at hand. Each management approach is demonstrated by its project application and impact on performance. The visibility given the project is discussed to emphasize communications as avenues for public information, technicalmore » exchange, and employee motivation.« less
  • The purpose of this paper is to communicate how new and established management techniques are applied to environmental restoration projects at the Savannah River Site. Specifically, the paper discusses application of four (4) management approaches: Total Quality Principles; Task Team Structure; Cost Time Management; SAFER (Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration). The objective is to share Savannah River Site experience and document case studies where certain approaches have enhanced projects at hand. Each management approach is demonstrated by its project application and impact on performance. The visibility given the project is discussed to emphasize communications as avenues for public information, technicalmore » exchange, and employee motivation.« less
  • During the performance of Fire Hazards Analyses (FHA) for Department of Energy facilities, the Fire Protection Engineer (FPE) is required to estimate fire hazards within a facility or fire area in question. A FHA attempts to describe and establish the relationships between fire and its environment. However, standardized tools and methods to produce quantitative descriptions of hazards have not been readily available or utilized at DOE sites in the past. The method of {open_quotes}hand type{close_quotes} calculations discussed in this paper, were developed to address deficiencies in the {open_quotes}average fuel loading{close_quotes} method of calculating fire severities. This methodology has been developedmore » as a method of continuing to perform FHAs under the {open_quotes}Interim Guidance{close_quotes} from DOE, on the performance of FHAs. The method described, has not received approval from DOE, nor has any been requested. It is changing and improving during use, and is being presented to provide an example of a potential calculation methodology. Using established engineering relationships and the hazards inventories present within a fire area, an engineer can predict the severities, damage potential, and impact on building systems and occupants. Some of these procedures and correlations have existed for a number of years, however, the computer has made it easy for the FPE to use them on a day to day basis. The method described has been used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to estimate fire severities and consequences in preparing a revision to the FHA for an existing Chemical Separations Facility. The object was to develop scenarios that predict realistic severities and losses, that would be utilized to develop cost efficient upgrades to protect the employees and public from the consequences of a fire in the facility. This FHA has not been submitted to DOE for review and comment as of the date of this paper.« less