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Title: Radiocarbon Dates and Palynological Characteristics of Sediments in Lake Melkoe, Anadyr River Basin, Chukotka

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
895707
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JRNL-220653
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Doklady Akademii Nauk, vol. 407, no. 2, January 1, 2006, pp. 235-237
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Shilo, N A, Lozhkin, A V, Anderson, P M, Brown, T A, Matrosova, T V, and Kotov, A N. Radiocarbon Dates and Palynological Characteristics of Sediments in Lake Melkoe, Anadyr River Basin, Chukotka. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1134/S1028334X06020164.
Shilo, N A, Lozhkin, A V, Anderson, P M, Brown, T A, Matrosova, T V, & Kotov, A N. Radiocarbon Dates and Palynological Characteristics of Sediments in Lake Melkoe, Anadyr River Basin, Chukotka. United States. doi:10.1134/S1028334X06020164.
Shilo, N A, Lozhkin, A V, Anderson, P M, Brown, T A, Matrosova, T V, and Kotov, A N. Fri . "Radiocarbon Dates and Palynological Characteristics of Sediments in Lake Melkoe, Anadyr River Basin, Chukotka". United States. doi:10.1134/S1028334X06020164. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/895707.
@article{osti_895707,
title = {Radiocarbon Dates and Palynological Characteristics of Sediments in Lake Melkoe, Anadyr River Basin, Chukotka},
author = {Shilo, N A and Lozhkin, A V and Anderson, P M and Brown, T A and Matrosova, T V and Kotov, A N},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1134/S1028334X06020164},
journal = {Doklady Akademii Nauk, vol. 407, no. 2, January 1, 2006, pp. 235-237},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 14 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Fri Apr 14 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
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