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Title: The Formability of Friction Stir Welds in Automotive Stamping Environments

Abstract

Automobile body and truck cab structures are composed primarily of stampings formed from monolithic and constant gage blanks. Cost and weight penalties can arise when strength or other requirements in one small area of the part leads to the use of a material or gage that is overmatched to the needs of the rest of the stamping. Tailor Welded Blanks (TWBs) are hybrid sheet products composed of either different materials or different thickness sheets that are joined together, then subjected to a stamping operation to create a formed assembly. The strategy is employed generally to save weight and material costs in the formed assembly by placing higher strength or thicker sections only where needed. The forming or stamping process requires the joint to be severely deformed along with the parent sheets. Aluminum TWBs for automotive applications are particularly problematic because of the low formability of aluminum weld metal. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a process recently applied to Aluminum TWBs that has the potential to produce a higher quality weld. The current study presents data on the mechanical properties, formability, and FSW weld process parameter development for friction stir welded aluminum, Tailor Welded Blanks. Friction stir welded TWBs can bemore » shown to have higher formability, higher ductility, and lower defect content than many competing joining processes, and they can be fabricated at speeds appropriate for automotive manufacturing.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
892881
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-48243
TRN: US200623%%518
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: SAE Transactions. Journal of Materials & Manufacturing, V114-5(619-629
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY; ALUMINIUM; DUCTILITY; FRICTION; MANUFACTURING; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; WELDING; MOLDING; Friction Stir Welding; FSW; Tailor Welded Blanks; Automotive Lightweight Materials

Citation Formats

Grant, Glenn J., Davies, Richard W., Stephens, Elizabeth V., Wazny, Scott, Kaunitz, Leon, and Waldron, Douglas J. The Formability of Friction Stir Welds in Automotive Stamping Environments. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Grant, Glenn J., Davies, Richard W., Stephens, Elizabeth V., Wazny, Scott, Kaunitz, Leon, & Waldron, Douglas J. The Formability of Friction Stir Welds in Automotive Stamping Environments. United States.
Grant, Glenn J., Davies, Richard W., Stephens, Elizabeth V., Wazny, Scott, Kaunitz, Leon, and Waldron, Douglas J. Wed . "The Formability of Friction Stir Welds in Automotive Stamping Environments". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_892881,
title = {The Formability of Friction Stir Welds in Automotive Stamping Environments},
author = {Grant, Glenn J. and Davies, Richard W. and Stephens, Elizabeth V. and Wazny, Scott and Kaunitz, Leon and Waldron, Douglas J.},
abstractNote = {Automobile body and truck cab structures are composed primarily of stampings formed from monolithic and constant gage blanks. Cost and weight penalties can arise when strength or other requirements in one small area of the part leads to the use of a material or gage that is overmatched to the needs of the rest of the stamping. Tailor Welded Blanks (TWBs) are hybrid sheet products composed of either different materials or different thickness sheets that are joined together, then subjected to a stamping operation to create a formed assembly. The strategy is employed generally to save weight and material costs in the formed assembly by placing higher strength or thicker sections only where needed. The forming or stamping process requires the joint to be severely deformed along with the parent sheets. Aluminum TWBs for automotive applications are particularly problematic because of the low formability of aluminum weld metal. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a process recently applied to Aluminum TWBs that has the potential to produce a higher quality weld. The current study presents data on the mechanical properties, formability, and FSW weld process parameter development for friction stir welded aluminum, Tailor Welded Blanks. Friction stir welded TWBs can be shown to have higher formability, higher ductility, and lower defect content than many competing joining processes, and they can be fabricated at speeds appropriate for automotive manufacturing.},
doi = {},
journal = {SAE Transactions. Journal of Materials & Manufacturing, V114-5(619-629},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Automobile body and truck cab structures are composed primarily of stampings formed from monolithic and constant gage blanks. Cost and weight penalties can arrise when strength or other requirements in one small area of the part leads to the use of a material or gage that is overmatched to the needs of the rest of the stamping. Tailor Welded Blanks (TWBs) are hybrid sheet products composed of either different materials or different thickness sheets that are joined together, then subjected to a stamping operation to create a formed assembly. The strategy is employed generally to save weight and material costsmore » in the formed assembly by placing higher strength or thicker sections only where needed. The forming or stamping process requires the joint to be severely deformed along with the parent sheets. Aluminum TWBs for automotive applications are particularly problematic because of the low formability of aluminum weld metal. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a process recently applied to Aluminum TWBs that has the potential to produce a higher quality weld. The current study presents data on the mechanical properties, formability, and FSW weld process parameter development for friction stir woined, aluminum, Tailor Welded Blanks. Friction stir welded TWBs can be shown to have higher formability, higher ductility, and lower defect content than many competing joining processes, and they can be fabricated at speeds appropriate for automotive manufacturing.« less
  • An integrated thermal-metallurgical-mechanical model is used to analyze and provide insights into the formation of the residual stress and the changes in microstructure and property of Al6061-T6 friction stir welds. The simulations were conducted by means of a three-dimensional finite element model that accounts for the phenomena of frictional heating, weld microstructure and strength changes due to dissolution and reprecipitation of the hardening precipitate particles, and the mechanical workpiece/tool contact during the friction stir welding (FSW) process. The model predictions were confirmed by experimental measurement data from previous studies. For the friction stir welds investigated, it was found that themore » residual stress distribution is strongly dependent on the welding process parameters and the degree of material softening caused by welding. The recovery of material strength from natural aging does not increase the residual stress in the weld. The failure of friction stir weld under tensile load is controlled by the combination of the reduction in strength and the residual stresses in the heat affected zone (HAZ).« less
  • The stability of the grain structure in 2219-O aluminum alloy friction stir welds during solution treatment has been investigated. Experimental results show that the solution treatment causes drastic grain growth, Grain growth initiates at the surface and the bottom of the weld and then extends to the weld centre within several minutes. The solution treatment temperature and the welding heat input have a significant effect on grain growth. The higher the solution temperature, or the higher the welding heat input, the greater the grain growth. The instability of the grains is attributed to an imbalance between thermodynamic driving forces formore » grain growth and the pinning forces impeding grain boundary migration during solution treatment.« less
  • The effect of tool traverse and rotation speeds on the microstructures and mechanical properties are quantified for welds between non-age-hardening Al5083 and age hardening Al2024 and compared to single alloy joints made from each of the two constituents. In this paper, we report the results of microstructural, mechanical property investigations of Al5186-Al2024 friction stir welds produced using various rotations and traveling speeds of the tool to investigate the effects of the welding parameters on the joint strength. Metallographic studies by optical microscopy, electron probe microscopy, and the utilization of the X-ray diffraction technique have been conducted. It was found thatmore » the weld properties were dominated by the thermal input rather than the mechanical deformation by the tool. In particular the larger stresses under the weld tool on the AA5186 side compared to the AA2024 side are related to a transient reduction in yield stress due to dissolution of the hardening precipitates during welding prior to natural aging after welding.« less
  • In this study, we explored the growth kinetics of the Al–Fe intermetallic (IM) layer at the joint interface of the St-12/Al-5083 friction stir lap welds during post-weld annealing treatment at 350, 400 and 450 °C for 30 to 180 min. Optical microscope (OM), field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were employed to investigate the structure of the weld zone. The thickness and composition of the IM layers were evaluated using image analysis system and electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD), respectively. Moreover, kernel average misorientation (KAM) analysis was performed to evaluate the level of stored energymore » in the as-welded state. The results showed that the growth kinetics of the IM layer was not governed by a parabolic diffusion law. Presence of the IM compounds as well as high stored energy near the joint interface of the as-welded sample was recognized to be the origin of the observed deviation from the parabolic diffusion law. - Highlights: • This work provided a new insight into growth kinetics of Al–Fe IM thickness. • The growth kinetics of IM layer was not governed by a parabolic diffusion law. • IM near the joint interface was the origin of deviation from the parabolic law. • High stored energy at joint interface was origin of deviation from parabolic law.« less