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Title: GEOLOGIC AND GEOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE MEAGER CREEK GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA

Abstract

Meager Creek is perhaps the most intensely explored geothermal system occurring in the Cascade and Garibaldi Volcanic Belts. This paper describes the results of new lithologic, petrographic, X-ray, isotopic, and geochemical investigations of core and cuttings from the Meager Creek wells. The data demonstrate that alteration related to the present geothermal system is superimposed on basement rocks which were metamorphosed and intruded by dioritic stocks prior to the onset of volcanism. The geothermal alteration developed mainly after emplacement of hypabyssal dikes associated with Meager Mountain volcanism and is characterized by mineral assemblages consisting primarily of sheet silicates, quartz, carbonate, hematite, iron oxides, pyrite, and minor epidote, potassium feldspar, actinolite and biotite. Permeabilities within the upper portions of the reservoir are low, reflecting filling of the fracture systems by carbonate. Petrographic observations suggest that sealing of the fractures accompanied hydrothermal brecciation and boiling of the fluids.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Earth Science Laboratory, University of Utah Research Institute
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
892566
Report Number(s):
SGP-TR-84; CONF-850107-41
TRN: US200623%%345
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 10. annual workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering, Stanford, CA (US), 01/22/1985
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; BASEMENT ROCK; BIOTITE; BOILING; BRITISH COLUMBIA; CANADA; GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; HEMATITE; IRON OXIDES; POSITIONING; POTASSIUM; PYRITE; QUARTZ; RESERVOIR ENGINEERING; SILICATES; STREAMS; VOLCANISM; Geothermal Legacy

Citation Formats

Moore, J.N., Adams, M.C., and Stauder, J.J.. GEOLOGIC AND GEOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE MEAGER CREEK GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Moore, J.N., Adams, M.C., & Stauder, J.J.. GEOLOGIC AND GEOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE MEAGER CREEK GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA. United States.
Moore, J.N., Adams, M.C., and Stauder, J.J.. Tue . "GEOLOGIC AND GEOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE MEAGER CREEK GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/892566.
@article{osti_892566,
title = {GEOLOGIC AND GEOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE MEAGER CREEK GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA},
author = {Moore, J.N. and Adams, M.C. and Stauder, J.J.},
abstractNote = {Meager Creek is perhaps the most intensely explored geothermal system occurring in the Cascade and Garibaldi Volcanic Belts. This paper describes the results of new lithologic, petrographic, X-ray, isotopic, and geochemical investigations of core and cuttings from the Meager Creek wells. The data demonstrate that alteration related to the present geothermal system is superimposed on basement rocks which were metamorphosed and intruded by dioritic stocks prior to the onset of volcanism. The geothermal alteration developed mainly after emplacement of hypabyssal dikes associated with Meager Mountain volcanism and is characterized by mineral assemblages consisting primarily of sheet silicates, quartz, carbonate, hematite, iron oxides, pyrite, and minor epidote, potassium feldspar, actinolite and biotite. Permeabilities within the upper portions of the reservoir are low, reflecting filling of the fracture systems by carbonate. Petrographic observations suggest that sealing of the fractures accompanied hydrothermal brecciation and boiling of the fluids.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 22 00:00:00 EST 1985},
month = {Tue Jan 22 00:00:00 EST 1985}
}

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  • Meager geothermal reservoir appears to be in ''thermochemical'' equilibrium as indicated by constant ion-concentration ratios (B/Li, B/K, NaLi, Na/Cl etc.). The Na/Li ratio describes the thermal conditions of the first and the deepest equilibrium reached by the thermal waters, whereas the Na/K indicates a secondary and shallower equilibrium. Analysis of the correlations between K, Na and Cl indicate that discharge from well MCl is probably a mixture between a single brine and high-chloride cool waters.
  • By measuring the induced-polarization parameters m (chargeability) and tau (time-constant) we have found evidence that the center of a presumed fossil hydrothermal system at Meager Creek, British Columbia, lies south of the main manifestation of the present-day convective hydrothermal system. What implication this finding has for development of the present-day system is unknown. However, some of the fractures formed during the development of the fossil hydrothermal system may serve as conduits for fluids of the present-day system. The analysis is limited by the lack of availability of a good subsurface distribution of core samples. Nevertheless, a surface induced-polarization survey ismore » expected to yield information about the geometry of the fossil system. Such knowledge would have implications not only for Meager Creek but for other hydrothermal systems of Cascades volcano type. 16 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.« less
  • Deuterium and oxygen-18 ([sup 18]O) have been measured in deep thermal, shallow thermal and non-thermal water samples collected at various times between 1982 and 1989 from the Meager Creek area, with the aim of assessing the origin of the thermal waters. The isotopic composition of the reservoir waters ([delta][sup 18]O = [minus]13[per thousand] and [delta]D= [minus]114.8[per thousand]) was calculated from data on post-flash deep thermal waters, using a two-stage steam loss model. The reservoir composition shows an oxygen shift of 2.4[per thousand] relative to the local meteoric water line. The composition of the recharge, obtained by removing the oxygen shift,more » is isotopically heavier than the average local meteoric waters, suggesting that the recharge may be from an area to the west of Mt Meager where isotopically heavier ground-waters are likely to be found. The small [delta][sup 18]O shift of the deep high-temperature waters is indicative of dominance of fracture-related permeability in the reservoir. Analyses of the chemistry and the temperature of the waters from hot springs and shallow thermal wells suggests that these waters have evolved from the deep geothermal waters through dilution by meteoric waters and about 40C adiabatic cooling (steam loss).« less
  • The Meager Mountain Volcanic Complex, 150 km north of Vancouver, B.C. has been a target of geothermal exploration since 1974. The study has been carried out jointly by B.C. Hydro, Energy, Mines and Resources Canada and co-funded by the Provincial Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources. Results indicate presence of two geothermal reservoirs approximately 12 km apart (South - North) within permeable fractured quartz diorite basement complex at depths between 1000-2000 m. Three diamond-drilled holes were completed in the South Reservoir area during 1979 and drilling results are compatible with earlier electrical resistivity surveys. The highest temperature recorded wasmore » 202 C at 367 m.« less
  • The application of an integrated geoscientific approach to the exploration stage of the Meager Creek geothermal project in British Columbia is discussed. The approach has provided a preliminary assessment of the resource potential of the area. The work has included geological reconnaissance, geophysics, and an extensive geochemical sampling program. The surveys have indicated that a geothermal resource exists on the south side of the Meager Complex an outflows down the Meager Valley. Geophysical surveys and drilling operations failed to identify evidence of an outflow from an active high-temperature geothermal system on the north side of the Meager complex.