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Title: Development of an Energy-Savings Calculation Methodology for Residential Miscellaneous Electric Loads: Preprint

Abstract

In order to meet whole-house energy savings targets beyond 50% in residential buildings, it will be essential that new technologies and systems approaches be developed to address miscellaneous electric loads (MELs). These MELs are comprised of the small and diverse collection of energy-consuming devices found in homes, including what are commonly known as plug loads (televisions, stereos, microwaves), along with all hard-wired loads that do not fit into other major end-use categories (doorbells, security systems, garage door openers). MELs present special challenges because their purchase and operation are largely under the control of the occupants. If no steps are taken to address MELs, they can constitute 40-50% of the remaining source energy use in homes that achieve 60-70% whole-house energy savings, and this percentage is likely to increase in the future as home electronics become even more sophisticated and their use becomes more widespread. Building America (BA), a U.S. Department of Energy research program that targets 50% energy savings by 2015 and 90% savings by 2025, has begun to identify and develop advanced solutions that can reduce MELs.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
891591
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-550-39551
TRN: US200622%%108
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: To be presented at the 2006 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 13-18 August 2006, Pacific Grove, California
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; OCCUPANTS; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS; TARGETS; BUILDING AMERICA; U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY; WHOLE-HOUSE ENERGY SAVINGS; MISCELLANEOUS ELECTRIC LOADS; MEL; ENERGY-CONSUMING APPLIANCES; END-USE CATEGORY; Buildings

Citation Formats

Hendron, R., and Eastment, M.. Development of an Energy-Savings Calculation Methodology for Residential Miscellaneous Electric Loads: Preprint. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Hendron, R., & Eastment, M.. Development of an Energy-Savings Calculation Methodology for Residential Miscellaneous Electric Loads: Preprint. United States.
Hendron, R., and Eastment, M.. Tue . "Development of an Energy-Savings Calculation Methodology for Residential Miscellaneous Electric Loads: Preprint". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/891591.
@article{osti_891591,
title = {Development of an Energy-Savings Calculation Methodology for Residential Miscellaneous Electric Loads: Preprint},
author = {Hendron, R. and Eastment, M.},
abstractNote = {In order to meet whole-house energy savings targets beyond 50% in residential buildings, it will be essential that new technologies and systems approaches be developed to address miscellaneous electric loads (MELs). These MELs are comprised of the small and diverse collection of energy-consuming devices found in homes, including what are commonly known as plug loads (televisions, stereos, microwaves), along with all hard-wired loads that do not fit into other major end-use categories (doorbells, security systems, garage door openers). MELs present special challenges because their purchase and operation are largely under the control of the occupants. If no steps are taken to address MELs, they can constitute 40-50% of the remaining source energy use in homes that achieve 60-70% whole-house energy savings, and this percentage is likely to increase in the future as home electronics become even more sophisticated and their use becomes more widespread. Building America (BA), a U.S. Department of Energy research program that targets 50% energy savings by 2015 and 90% savings by 2025, has begun to identify and develop advanced solutions that can reduce MELs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Tue Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}

Conference:
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