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Title: FreedomCAR Advanced Traction Drive Motor Development Phase I

Abstract

The overall objective of this program is to design and develop an advanced traction motor that will meet the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) 2010 goals and the traction motor technical targets. The motor specifications are given in Section 1.3. Other goals of the program include providing a cost study to ensure the motor can be developed within the cost targets needed for the automotive industry. The program has focused on using materials that are both high performance and low costs such that the performance can be met and cost targets are achieved. In addition, the motor technologies and machine design features must be compatible with high volume manufacturing and able to provide high reliability, efficiency, and ruggedness while simultaneously reducing weight and volume. Weight and volume reduction will become a major factor in reducing cost, material cost being the most significant part of manufacturing cost at high volume. Many motor technology categories have been considered in the past and present for traction drive applications, including: brushed direct current (DC), PM (PM) brushless dc (BLDC), alternating current (AC) induction, switched reluctance and synchronous reluctance machines. Of these machine technologies, PM BLDC has consistently demonstrated an advantage in terms of powermore » density and efficiency. As rare earth magnet cost has declined, total cost may also be reduced over the other technologies. Of the many different configurations of PM BLDC machines, those which incorporate power production utilizing both magnetic torque as well as reluctance torque appear to have the most promise for traction applications. There are many different PM BLDC machine configurations which employ both of these torque producing mechanisms; however, most would fall into one of two categories--some use weaker magnets and rely more heavily on reluctance torque (reluctance-dominant PM machines), others use strong PMs and supplement with reluctance torque (magnet-dominant PM machines). This report covers a trade study that was conducted in this phase I program to explore which type of machine best suits the FCVT requirements.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. UQM Technologies, Inc.
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
891263
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2006/UQM
TRN: US200621%%624
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY; INDUCTION; MAGNETS; MANUFACTURING; MOTORS; POWER DENSITY; SPECIFICATIONS; TORQUE; MECHANICAL TRANSMISSIONS

Citation Formats

Ley, Josh, and Lutz, Jon. FreedomCAR Advanced Traction Drive Motor Development Phase I. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/891263.
Ley, Josh, & Lutz, Jon. FreedomCAR Advanced Traction Drive Motor Development Phase I. United States. doi:10.2172/891263.
Ley, Josh, and Lutz, Jon. Fri . "FreedomCAR Advanced Traction Drive Motor Development Phase I". United States. doi:10.2172/891263. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/891263.
@article{osti_891263,
title = {FreedomCAR Advanced Traction Drive Motor Development Phase I},
author = {Ley, Josh and Lutz, Jon},
abstractNote = {The overall objective of this program is to design and develop an advanced traction motor that will meet the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) 2010 goals and the traction motor technical targets. The motor specifications are given in Section 1.3. Other goals of the program include providing a cost study to ensure the motor can be developed within the cost targets needed for the automotive industry. The program has focused on using materials that are both high performance and low costs such that the performance can be met and cost targets are achieved. In addition, the motor technologies and machine design features must be compatible with high volume manufacturing and able to provide high reliability, efficiency, and ruggedness while simultaneously reducing weight and volume. Weight and volume reduction will become a major factor in reducing cost, material cost being the most significant part of manufacturing cost at high volume. Many motor technology categories have been considered in the past and present for traction drive applications, including: brushed direct current (DC), PM (PM) brushless dc (BLDC), alternating current (AC) induction, switched reluctance and synchronous reluctance machines. Of these machine technologies, PM BLDC has consistently demonstrated an advantage in terms of power density and efficiency. As rare earth magnet cost has declined, total cost may also be reduced over the other technologies. Of the many different configurations of PM BLDC machines, those which incorporate power production utilizing both magnetic torque as well as reluctance torque appear to have the most promise for traction applications. There are many different PM BLDC machine configurations which employ both of these torque producing mechanisms; however, most would fall into one of two categories--some use weaker magnets and rely more heavily on reluctance torque (reluctance-dominant PM machines), others use strong PMs and supplement with reluctance torque (magnet-dominant PM machines). This report covers a trade study that was conducted in this phase I program to explore which type of machine best suits the FCVT requirements.},
doi = {10.2172/891263},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2006},
month = {9}
}