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Title: An Evaluation of Geopressured Brine Injectability

Abstract

We-have developed an apparatus with a capability for evaluating geopressured brine injectability at elevated pressures and temperatures. The apparatus utilizes membrane filters as injection zone reservoir analogs and permits injectability tests to be performed in accordance with Barkman and Davidson Methdology. A field evaluation of geopressured brine injectability was completed during September 22-25, 1980 at the DOE, Brazoria test site in Texas. Membrane filters, with pore sizes of 0.4-{micro}m and 10.0-{micro}m, were used as the basis for obtaining suspended solids data and for developing performance-life estimates of typical spent brine injection wells. Field measurements were made at 130{degree}C and line pressures up to 3800 psig. Scale inhibited (phosphonate-polyacrylate threshold-type, carbonate scale inhibitor), prefiltered-scale-inhibited, and raw (untreated) brine were evaluated. Test results indicated raw brine was highly injectable, while scale-inhibited brine had extremely low quality. The poor injectability of scale-inhibited brine resulted from partial precipitation of the scale inhibitor.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Terra Tek, Inc., Salt Lake City, Utah
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
889103
Report Number(s):
SGP-TR-50-14
DOE Contract Number:
AT03-80SF11459
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proceedings, Sixth Workshop Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, December 16-18, 1980
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Geothermal Legacy

Citation Formats

Owen, L.B., Blair, C.K., Harrar, J.E., and Netherton, R. An Evaluation of Geopressured Brine Injectability. United States: N. p., 1980. Web.
Owen, L.B., Blair, C.K., Harrar, J.E., & Netherton, R. An Evaluation of Geopressured Brine Injectability. United States.
Owen, L.B., Blair, C.K., Harrar, J.E., and Netherton, R. Tue . "An Evaluation of Geopressured Brine Injectability". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/889103.
@article{osti_889103,
title = {An Evaluation of Geopressured Brine Injectability},
author = {Owen, L.B. and Blair, C.K. and Harrar, J.E. and Netherton, R.},
abstractNote = {We-have developed an apparatus with a capability for evaluating geopressured brine injectability at elevated pressures and temperatures. The apparatus utilizes membrane filters as injection zone reservoir analogs and permits injectability tests to be performed in accordance with Barkman and Davidson Methdology. A field evaluation of geopressured brine injectability was completed during September 22-25, 1980 at the DOE, Brazoria test site in Texas. Membrane filters, with pore sizes of 0.4-{micro}m and 10.0-{micro}m, were used as the basis for obtaining suspended solids data and for developing performance-life estimates of typical spent brine injection wells. Field measurements were made at 130{degree}C and line pressures up to 3800 psig. Scale inhibited (phosphonate-polyacrylate threshold-type, carbonate scale inhibitor), prefiltered-scale-inhibited, and raw (untreated) brine were evaluated. Test results indicated raw brine was highly injectable, while scale-inhibited brine had extremely low quality. The poor injectability of scale-inhibited brine resulted from partial precipitation of the scale inhibitor.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Dec 16 00:00:00 EST 1980},
month = {Tue Dec 16 00:00:00 EST 1980}
}

Conference:
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  • A field evaluation of geopressured brine injectability was completed during September 22 to 25, 1980 at the DOE, Brazoria test site in Texas. Membrane filters, with pore sizes of 0.4-..mu..m and 10.0-..mu..m, were used as the basis for obtaining suspended solids data and for developing performance-life estimates of typical spent brine injection wells. Field measurements were made at 130/sup 0/C and line pressures up to 3800 psig. Scale inhibited (phosphonate-polyacrylate threshold-type, carbonate scale inhibitor), prefiltered-scale-inhibited, and untreated brine were evaluated. Test results indicated that raw brine was highly injectable, while scale-inhibited brine had extremely low quality. The poor injectability ofmore » scale-inhibited brine resulted from partial precipitation of the scale inhibitor.« less
  • A mobile, field test system has been developed for on-line evaluation of geopressured brine injectability at elevated pressures and temperatures. The apparatus consists of a flow system that is connected directly to the well-site brine-handling equipment. The system permits injectability assessment on the basis of standard membrane filtration tests and an examination of the effects of brine aging by means of incubation tests. Auxiliary instrumentation is used to characterize the brine suspended solids. The test system is being used to diagnose water quality at the design wells.
  • This work involved extensive field tests at three Strategic Petroleum Reserve conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to improve the performance of brine injection wells. It was established that granular media filtration, when used with proper chemical pretreatments, provides an effective and economical method for removing particulates from hypersaline brines. This treatment allows for the injection of 200,000 bpd with significantly increased well half-lives of 30 years. 7 refs.
  • The Technology Forecasting and Assessment Division of the Center for Energy Studies at The University of Texas at Austin has studied the institutional structures and initiatives which must evolve in order to support an accelerated commercialization program for the geothermal resource underlying the Texas Gulf Coast region. A market survey of 267 low-grade process heat users was conducted along the 30-county coastal area to define the potential market for the thermal or combined thermal-methane components of the resource. The principal findings were (1) methane is the major fuel of all industry groups, though some substitution of other fuels is anticipated;more » (2) low anticipated capital replacements and the existence of unused low-grade heat limit the potential market; (3) fuel costs and reliability of supply are primary consideration in purchase of process-heat equipment; and (4) geothermal, oil, and utility companies are acceptable geothermal suppliers, while government agencies not.« less
  • Recovery of methane from Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal reservoirs does not appear to be profitable without a rise in natural gas prices to offset high production costs. If injection into the production reservoir becomes necessary to maintain productivity and to minimize subsidence, the injection pumping costs approach and even exceed the value of the recoverable methane. An option aimed at reducing the injection pump operating costs is to maintain a higher than normal pressure at the production wellhead to reduce the injection-pumping work load. This option, however, is considerably less attractive if that portion of methane still dissolved at elevated pressuremore » cannot be recovered. Therefore, there is a strong incentive to devise methods for extracting methane at high pressures and temperatures. Liquid extraction with a very low water-soluble organic is a technically feasible method and looks promising as an applicable process. A candidate solvent is hexadecane, a paraffinic hydrocarbon with the necessary phase-equilibrium thermodynamic properties to satisfy the technical requirements for such an operation, without any obvious economic barriers. Gas stripping is another technically feasible method, but the economics do not look favorable because of gas dissolution losses. Freon refrigerants were considered because of their ease of product-stripping gas separation and nitrogen was considered because of its low cost. Brine-driven positive displacement pumps with provisions for methane exsolution are technically feasible concepts and could eliminate or greatly reduce pump power costs. These extraction operations will not preclude the option of recovering the thermal energy component, if desired.« less