skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Rationalizing requirements for gaps, surface offsets and edge radii in miniature welded components.

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
883473
Report Number(s):
SAND2005-7622C
TRN: US200614%%640
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the IMOG Subgroup on Joining Meeting held December 6-7, 2005 in Aiken, SC.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; DEFECTS; WELDED JOINTS; MINIATURIZATION

Citation Formats

Knorovsky, Gerald Albert, Roach, Robert Allen, Norris, Jerome T., Holm, Elizabeth Ann, and Robino, Charles Victor. Rationalizing requirements for gaps, surface offsets and edge radii in miniature welded components.. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Knorovsky, Gerald Albert, Roach, Robert Allen, Norris, Jerome T., Holm, Elizabeth Ann, & Robino, Charles Victor. Rationalizing requirements for gaps, surface offsets and edge radii in miniature welded components.. United States.
Knorovsky, Gerald Albert, Roach, Robert Allen, Norris, Jerome T., Holm, Elizabeth Ann, and Robino, Charles Victor. Thu . "Rationalizing requirements for gaps, surface offsets and edge radii in miniature welded components.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_883473,
title = {Rationalizing requirements for gaps, surface offsets and edge radii in miniature welded components.},
author = {Knorovsky, Gerald Albert and Roach, Robert Allen and Norris, Jerome T. and Holm, Elizabeth Ann and Robino, Charles Victor},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • Most environmental restoration projects at federal facilities face the difficult task of melding the quality assurance (QA) requirements of multiple clients, as well as dealing with historical data that are often of unknown quality. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), we have successfully integrated the requirements of our multiple clients by carefully developing a QA program that efficiently meets our clients` needs. The Site 300 Experimental Test Site is operated by LLNL in support of its national defense program. The responsibility for conducting environmental contaminant investigations and restoration at Site 300 is vested in the Site 300 Environmental Restoration Projectmore » (Site 300 ERP) of LLNL`s Environmental Restoration Division. LLNL Site 300 ERP must comply with the QA requirements of several clients, which include: the LLNL Environmental Protection Department, the DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency-Region IX (EPA), the California Regional Water Quality Control Board -- Central Valley Region, and the California Department of Toxic Substances Control. This comprehensive QA program was used to determine the acceptability of historical data. The Site 300 ERP began soil and ground water investigations in 1982. However, we did not begin receiving analytical quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) data until 1989; therefore, the pre-1989 data that were collected are of unknown quality. The US EPA QAMS-005/80 defines data quality as the totality of features and characteristics of data that bears on its ability to satisfy a given purpose. In the current context, the characteristics of major importance are accuracy, precision, completeness, representativeness, and comparability. Using our established QA program, we determined the quality of this historical data based on its comparability to the post-1989 data. By accepting this historical data, we were able to save a considerable amount of money in recharacterization costs.« less
  • Abstract not provided.
  • Abstract not provided.
  • The first-principles theory for calculating surface-state energies and semiconductor band offsets is described. Within a quasiparticle interpretation of excitation spectra, the approach provides well-founded energies which can be compared directly with sepctroscopy measurements. Results for the As-capped Si(111) and Ge(111) surfaces and for the GaAs-AlAs(001) heterojunction are discussed and compared with experiment. 14 refs., 3 figs.