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Title: Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid

Abstract

Citric acid has been shown to act as an agent for increasing the solubility of aluminum oxyhydroxides in aqueous solutions of high (>2.47 mol/mol) hydroxide-to-aluminum ratios. Conversely, citric acid also colloidally stabilizes particles in aqueous suspensions of aluminum-containing particles. Solutions of aluminum chloride, with and without citric acid added, were titrated with NaO(aq). The presence and size of particles were determined using quasi-elastic light scattering. In solutions that contained no citric acid, particles formed instantaneously when NaOH(aq) was added but these were observed to rapidly diminish in size, disappearing at OH/Al ratios below 2.5 mol/mol. When the OH/Al ratio was raised beyond 2.5 by addingmoreNaOH(aq), suspensions of colloidally stable particles formed. Large polycations containing 13 aluminum atoms were detected by 27Al solution NMR in citric-acid-free solutions with OH/Al ratios slightly lower than 2.5. In comparison, adding citric acid to solutions of aluminum chloride inhibited the formation of large aluminum-containing polycations. The absence of the polycations prevents or retards the subsequent formation of particles, indicating that the polycations, when present, act as seeds to the formation of new particles. Particles did not form in solutions with a citric acid/aluminum ratio of 0.8 until sufficient NaOH(aq) was added to raise the OH/Almore » ratio to 3.29. By comparison, lower amounts of citric acid did not prevent particles from forming but did retard the rate of growth.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
876999
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-47921
Journal ID: ISSN 0743-7463; LANGD5; KC0201050; TRN: US200608%%236
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Langmuir, 21(25):11690-11695; Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 25
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ALUMINIUM HYDROXIDES; CITRIC ACID; PRECIPITATION; SOLUBILITY; COLLOIDS

Citation Formats

Dabbs, Daniel M., Ramachandran, Usha, Lu, Sang, Liu, Jun, Wang, Li Q., and Aksay, Ilhan A.. Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1021/la050822f.
Dabbs, Daniel M., Ramachandran, Usha, Lu, Sang, Liu, Jun, Wang, Li Q., & Aksay, Ilhan A.. Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid. United States. doi:10.1021/la050822f.
Dabbs, Daniel M., Ramachandran, Usha, Lu, Sang, Liu, Jun, Wang, Li Q., and Aksay, Ilhan A.. Tue . "Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid". United States. doi:10.1021/la050822f.
@article{osti_876999,
title = {Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid},
author = {Dabbs, Daniel M. and Ramachandran, Usha and Lu, Sang and Liu, Jun and Wang, Li Q. and Aksay, Ilhan A.},
abstractNote = {Citric acid has been shown to act as an agent for increasing the solubility of aluminum oxyhydroxides in aqueous solutions of high (>2.47 mol/mol) hydroxide-to-aluminum ratios. Conversely, citric acid also colloidally stabilizes particles in aqueous suspensions of aluminum-containing particles. Solutions of aluminum chloride, with and without citric acid added, were titrated with NaO(aq). The presence and size of particles were determined using quasi-elastic light scattering. In solutions that contained no citric acid, particles formed instantaneously when NaOH(aq) was added but these were observed to rapidly diminish in size, disappearing at OH/Al ratios below 2.5 mol/mol. When the OH/Al ratio was raised beyond 2.5 by addingmoreNaOH(aq), suspensions of colloidally stable particles formed. Large polycations containing 13 aluminum atoms were detected by 27Al solution NMR in citric-acid-free solutions with OH/Al ratios slightly lower than 2.5. In comparison, adding citric acid to solutions of aluminum chloride inhibited the formation of large aluminum-containing polycations. The absence of the polycations prevents or retards the subsequent formation of particles, indicating that the polycations, when present, act as seeds to the formation of new particles. Particles did not form in solutions with a citric acid/aluminum ratio of 0.8 until sufficient NaOH(aq) was added to raise the OH/Al ratio to 3.29. By comparison, lower amounts of citric acid did not prevent particles from forming but did retard the rate of growth.},
doi = {10.1021/la050822f},
journal = {Langmuir, 21(25):11690-11695},
number = 25,
volume = 21,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Dec 06 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Dec 06 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
  • Hot-water-treatment has been adapted to fabricate ultrafine nanoporous palladium-aluminum film from aluminum-palladium alloy film. Using citric acid as a chelating agent, a precipitation of boehmite (aluminum oxide hydroxide, AlOOH) on the nanoporous palladium-aluminum film was suppressed. According to cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy observations, the ligament/pore sizes of the prepared nanoporous film were considerably small (on the order of 10 nm). Since this fabrication method only requires aluminum alloy film and hot-water with chelating agent, the ultrafine nanoporous film can be prepared simply and environmentally friendly.
  • Mutant strains of Aspergillus niger with reduced citrate control of carbohydrate catabolism (cic mutants) grow faster than the parent strain on media containing 5% (wt/vol) citrate. The mutants tolerated a higher intracellular citrate concentration than the parent strain. One mutant (cic-7/3) contained phosphofructokinase activity significantly less sensitive towards citrate than the enzyme from the parent strain. When this mutant was grown under citrate accumulating conditions, acidogenesis was far less sensitive to inhibition by Mn/sup 2 +/ than in the parent strain. Some of the cic mutants also showed altered citrate inhibition of NADP-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase.
  • Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► WO{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple citric acid-assisted precipitation. ► WO{sub 3} photocatalyst was able to the partial mineralization of rhB, IC and MO. ► WO{sub 3} can be considered as a photocatalyst active under visible light irradiation. -- Abstract: WO{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized by citric acid-assisted precipitation method using a 1:1.5 molar ratio of ammonium paratungstate hydrate (H{sub 42}N{sub 10}O{sub 42}W{sub 12}·xH{sub 2}O):citric acid (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 7}). The formation of monoclinic crystal structure of WO{sub 3} at different temperatures was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The characterization ofmore » the samples synthesized was complemented by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Brunauer–Emmitt–Teller surface area (BET) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). According to the thermal treatment followed during the synthesis of WO{sub 3}, the morphology of the nanoparticles formed was characterized by rectangular and ovoid shapes. The photocatalytic activity of WO{sub 3} obtained under different experimental conditions was evaluated in the degradation of rhodamine B (rhB), indigo carmine (IC), methyl orange (MO), and Congo red (CR) in aqueous solution under UV and UV–vis radiation. The highest photocatalytic activity was observed in the sample obtained by thermal treatment at 700 °C. In general, the sequence of degradation of the organic dyes was: indigo carmine (IC) > rhodamine B (rhB) > methyl orange (MO) > Congo red (CR). The mineralization degree of organic dyes by WO{sub 3} photocatalysts was determined by total organic carbon analysis (TOC) reaching percentages of mineralization of 82% (rhB), 85% (IC), 28% (MO), and 7% (CR) for 96 h of lamp irradiation.« less
  • One proposed mechanism of aluminum (Al) tolerance in plants is the release of an Al-chelating compound into the rhizosphere. In this experiment, two cultivars of snapbeans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. Romano and Dade) that differ in Al tolerance were grown hydroponically with and without Al under aseptic conditions. After growth in nutrient solutions for 8 days, aliphatic and phenolic organic acids were analyzed in the culture solutions with an ion chromatograph and a high pressure liquid chromatograph. The tolerant snapbean, Dade when exposed to Al, exuded citric acid into the rhizosphere in a concentration that was 70 times as great asmore » that of Dade grown without Al, and 10 times as great as that of Romano grown without Al, and 10 times as great as that of Romano, exuded only slightly more citric acid into the growing medium under Al-stress, compared to nonstressed conditions. Citric acid is known to chelate Al strongly and to reverse its phytotoxic effects. Also, citric acid has been shown previously to enhance the availability of phosphorus (P) from insoluble Al phosphates, Thus, one mechanism of Al-tolerance in snapbeans appears to be the exudation of citric acid into the rhizosphere, induced either by toxic levels of Al or by low P due to the precipitation of insoluble Al phosphates. The experiment was not able to distinguish between these two factors; however, tolerance to both primary and secondary Al-stress injuries are important for plants growing in Al-toxic soils.« less