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Title: Power Quality Aspects in a Wind Power Plant: Preprint

Abstract

Although many operational aspects affect wind power plant operation, this paper focuses on power quality. Because a wind power plant is connected to the grid, it is very important to understand the sources of disturbances that affect the power quality.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
875771
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-500-39183
TRN: US200603%%241
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: To be presented at the IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting, 18-22 June 2006, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; DISTURBANCES; WIND POWER PLANTS; WIND POWER; WIND TURBINES; WIND TURBINE; WIND FARM; WIND POWER PLANT; POWER QUALITY; WIND ENERGY; AGGREGATION; POWER SYSTEMS; RENEWABLE ENERGY; REACTIVE POWER COMPENSATION; SELF-EXCITATION; HARMONICS; Wind Energy

Citation Formats

Muljadi, E., Butterfield, C. P., Chacon, J., and Romanowitz, H.. Power Quality Aspects in a Wind Power Plant: Preprint. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1109/PES.2006.1709244.
Muljadi, E., Butterfield, C. P., Chacon, J., & Romanowitz, H.. Power Quality Aspects in a Wind Power Plant: Preprint. United States. doi:10.1109/PES.2006.1709244.
Muljadi, E., Butterfield, C. P., Chacon, J., and Romanowitz, H.. Sun . "Power Quality Aspects in a Wind Power Plant: Preprint". United States. doi:10.1109/PES.2006.1709244. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/875771.
@article{osti_875771,
title = {Power Quality Aspects in a Wind Power Plant: Preprint},
author = {Muljadi, E. and Butterfield, C. P. and Chacon, J. and Romanowitz, H.},
abstractNote = {Although many operational aspects affect wind power plant operation, this paper focuses on power quality. Because a wind power plant is connected to the grid, it is very important to understand the sources of disturbances that affect the power quality.},
doi = {10.1109/PES.2006.1709244},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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