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Title: Aerobic landfill bioreactor

Abstract

The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

Inventors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. (Aiken, SC)
  2. (Winterville, GA)
  3. (Andersonville, SC)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SOUTHEASTERN TECHNOLOGY CENTER
OSTI Identifier:
872852
Patent Number(s):
US 6024513
Assignee:
American Technologies Inc (Oakridge, TN) SRS
DOE Contract Number:
FC09-95SR18525
Resource Type:
Patent
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
aerobic; landfill; bioreactor; method; decomposing; municipal; solid; waste; msw; converting; degradation; following; manner; injecting; air; via; leachate; collection; vertical; injection; installed; mass; applying; pressurized; drip; irrigation; allowing; gases; adjusting; recirculated; achieve; 40; 60; moisture; level; temperature; 120; degree; 140; steady; fill gas; solid waste; municipal solid; injecting air; air injection; /405/71/210/435/588/

Citation Formats

Hudgins, Mark P, Bessette, Bernard J, March, John, and McComb, Scott T. Aerobic landfill bioreactor. United States: N. p., 2000. Web.
Hudgins, Mark P, Bessette, Bernard J, March, John, & McComb, Scott T. Aerobic landfill bioreactor. United States.
Hudgins, Mark P, Bessette, Bernard J, March, John, and McComb, Scott T. Sat . "Aerobic landfill bioreactor". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/872852.
@article{osti_872852,
title = {Aerobic landfill bioreactor},
author = {Hudgins, Mark P and Bessette, Bernard J and March, John and McComb, Scott T.},
abstractNote = {The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2000},
month = {Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2000}
}

Patent:

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  • The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120 F and 140 F in steady state.
  • The present invention includes a system of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.
  • The operation of landfills as controlled bioreactors under wet conditions offers the potential for safer and more effective management of landfilled solid waste relative to traditional dry landfill systems. The effects of different environmental conditions on the degree and rate of landfill stabilization have been evaluated in a number of pilot-scale studies during the previous twenty years. These studies have demonstrated that increased levels of moisture in the waste and the recycle of leachate through the waste increase the rate of waste stabilization. Benefits of leachate recycle, including leachate hydrologic management and in-situ leachate treatment, make leachate recycle an attractivemore » option for some landfill operators. A number of landfill currently practice leachate recycle throughout the United States. This paper reviews recent results regarding gas collection from an operating bioreactor landfill in Alachua County, Florida.« less
  • A bioreactor landfill cell with 1.2-acre footprint was constructed, filled, operated, and monitored at Northern Oaks Recycling and Disposal Facility (NORDF) at Harrison, MI. With a filled volume of 74,239 cubic yards, the cell contained approximately 35,317 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) and 20,777 tons of cover soil. It was laid on the slope of an existing cell but separated by a geosynthetic membrane liner. After the cell reached a design height of 60 feet, it was covered with a geosynthetic membrane cap. A three-dimensional monitoring system to collect data at 48 different locations was designed and installed duringmore » the construction phase of the bioreactor cell. Each location had a cluster of monitoring devices consisting of a probe to monitor moisture and temperature, a leachate collection basin, and a gas sampling port. An increase in moisture content of the MSW in the bioreactor cell was achieved by pumping leachate collected on-site from various other cells, as well as recirculation of leachate from the bioreactor landfill cell itself. Three types of leachate injection systems were evaluated in this bioreactor cell for their efficacy to distribute pumped leachate uniformly: a leachate injection pipe buried in a 6-ft wide horizontal stone mound, a 15-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer, and a 60-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer. All leachate injection systems were installed on top of the compacted waste surface. The distribution of water and resulting MSW moisture content throughout the bioreactor cell was found to be similar for the three designs. Water coming into and leaving the cell (leachate pumped in, precipitation, snow, evaporation, and collected leachate) was monitored in order to carry out a water balance. Using a leachate injection rate of 26 – 30 gal/yard3, the average moisture content increased from 25% to 35% (wet based) over the period of this study. One of the key aspects of this bioreactor landfill study was to evaluate bioreactor start up and performance in locations with colder climate. For lifts filled during the summer months, methane generation started within three months after completion of the lift. For lifts filled in winter months, very little methane production occurred even eight months after filling. The temperature data indicated that subzero or slightly above zero (oC) temperatures persisted for unusually long periods (more than six months) in the lifts filled during winter months. This was likely due to the high thermal insulation capability of the MSW and the low level of biological activity during start up. This observation indicates that bioreactor landfills located in cold climate and filled during winter months may require mechanisms to increase temperature and initiate biodegradation. Thus, besides moisture, temperature may be the next important factor controlling the biological decomposition in anaerobic bioreactor landfills. Spatial and temporal characterization of leachate samples indicated the presence of low levels of commonly used volatile organic compounds (including acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, and toluene) and metals (including arsenic, chromium, and zinc). Changes and leachate and gaseous sample characteristics correlated with enhanced biological activity and increase in temperature. Continued monitoring of this bioreactor landfill cell is expected to yield critical data needed for start up, design, and operation of this emerging process.« less
  • The Department of Defense has over 12,000 sites that are contaminated from past military activities. Many site contain volatile organic contaminants that may be treated using aboveground or in situ aerobic biotreatment systems. Three oxygen sources for activated sludge were evaluated using 3-L chemostats treating amended groundwater containing over 200 mg/l benzene. The oxygen sources were compared based on percent contaminant removal, reduction of benzene off-gassing, and biomass stability. The fate of hydrogen peroxide in an activated sludge system was evaluated and described using an equation that determines steady-state hydrogen peroxide concentration. The equation is essentially a simple fate modelmore » that includes input, output, and both biotic and abiotic terms. The results indicated that peroxide could be used as an alternative oxygen source with no release of benzene into the ambient air; however, this approach was found to be expensive because of the high cost of hydrogen peroxide. Benzene was removed from the groundwater to below detection levels. Pure oxygen sparging was a particularly attractive means of introducing oxygen with minimal stripping of benzene. Biotic reactions dominated hydrogen peroxide fate within an activated sludge system. The reaction between hydrogen peroxide and biomass was second order overall and first order with respect to both reactants.« less