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Title: Process for gamma ray induced degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls

Abstract

The invention is a process for the in-situ destruction of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compounds in transformer oils and transformers. These compounds are broken down selectively by irradiation of the object or mixture using spent nuclear fuel or any isotopic source of high energy gamma radiation. For example, the level of applied dose required to decompose 400 ppm of polychlorinated biphenyl in transformer oil to less than 50 ppm is 500 kilogray. Destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls to levels of less than 50 ppm renders the transformer oil or transformer non-PCB contaminated under current regulations. Therefore, this process can be used to treat PCB contaminated oil and equipment to minimize or eliminate the generation of PCB hazardous waste.

Inventors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. (Idaho Falls, ID)
  2. (Shelley, ID)
  3. (Blackfoot, ID)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID
OSTI Identifier:
871806
Patent Number(s):
US 5799257
Assignee:
Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (Idaho Falls, ID) INEEL
DOE Contract Number:
AC07-94ID13223
Resource Type:
Patent
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
process; gamma; ray; induced; degradation; polychlorinated; biphenyls; in-situ; destruction; biphenyl; pcb; compounds; transformer; oils; transformers; broken; selectively; irradiation; mixture; spent; nuclear; fuel; isotopic; source; energy; radiation; example; level; applied; dose; required; decompose; 400; ppm; oil; 50; 500; kilogray; levels; renders; non-pcb; contaminated; current; regulations; treat; equipment; minimize; eliminate; generation; hazardous; waste; polychlorinated biphenyl; gamma ray; hazardous waste; nuclear fuel; spent nuclear; gamma radiation; polychlorinated biphenyls; transformer oil; energy gamma; in-situ destruction; induced degradation; situ destruction; /588/204/

Citation Formats

Meikrantz, David H., Mincher, Bruce J., and Arbon, Rodney E. Process for gamma ray induced degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Meikrantz, David H., Mincher, Bruce J., & Arbon, Rodney E. Process for gamma ray induced degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls. United States.
Meikrantz, David H., Mincher, Bruce J., and Arbon, Rodney E. Thu . "Process for gamma ray induced degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/871806.
@article{osti_871806,
title = {Process for gamma ray induced degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls},
author = {Meikrantz, David H. and Mincher, Bruce J. and Arbon, Rodney E.},
abstractNote = {The invention is a process for the in-situ destruction of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compounds in transformer oils and transformers. These compounds are broken down selectively by irradiation of the object or mixture using spent nuclear fuel or any isotopic source of high energy gamma radiation. For example, the level of applied dose required to decompose 400 ppm of polychlorinated biphenyl in transformer oil to less than 50 ppm is 500 kilogray. Destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls to levels of less than 50 ppm renders the transformer oil or transformer non-PCB contaminated under current regulations. Therefore, this process can be used to treat PCB contaminated oil and equipment to minimize or eliminate the generation of PCB hazardous waste.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1998},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1998}
}

Patent:

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  • The invention is a process for the in-situ destruction of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compounds in transformer oils and transformers. These compounds are broken down selectively by irradiation of the object or mixture using spent nuclear fuel or any isotopic source of high energy gamma radiation. For example, the level of applied dose required to decompose 400 ppm of polychlorinated biphenyl in transformer oil to less than 50 ppm is 500 kilograms. Destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls to levels of less than 50 ppm renders the transformer oil or transformer non-PCB contaminated under current regulations. Therefore, this process can be used tomore » treat PCB contaminated oil and equipment to minimize or eliminate the generation of PCB hazardous waste. 5 figs.« less
  • The present invention relates to a method of removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil. The polychlorinated biphenyls are extracted from the soil by employing a liquid organic solvent dispersed in water in the ratio of about 1:3 to 3:1. The organic solvent includes such materials as short-chain hydrocarbons including kerosene or gasoline which are immiscible with water and are nonpolar. The organic solvent has a greater affinity for the PCB's than the soil so as to extract the PCB's from the soil upon contact. The organic solvent phase is separated from the suspended soil and water phase and distilled for permittingmore » the recycle of the organic solvent phase and the concentration of the PCB's in the remaining organic phase. The present process can be satisfactorily practiced with soil containing 10 to 20% petroleum-based oils and organic fluids such as used in transformers and cutting fluids, coolants and the like which contain PCB's. The subject method provides for the removal of a sufficient concentration of PCB's from the soil to provide the soil with a level of PCB's within the guidelines of the Environmental Protection Agency.« less
  • The invention is a relatively simple and inexpensive process for detoxifying oils contaminated with PCBs and/or PBBs. The process is especially suitable for processing lubricating oils containing such contaminants. In one aspect of the invention, the contaminated lubricating oil is contacted with a particulate reagent comprising adsorbent particles carrying a dispersion of metallic sodium. The solid sodium reagent converts the PCB and/or PBB contaminants to environmentally acceptable products and also converts various sodium-reactive additives normally present in lubricating oil to reaction products. The adsorbent reagent retains most of the products and is easily separated from the detoxified oil. The detoxifiedmore » oil may be fortified with various additives functionally equivalent to those removed during detoxification.« less
  • A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contracting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible polyhydroxy compound, such as, water, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of themore » polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds in the low polar or nonpolar solvent by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered for recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 2 tables.« less
  • A process for the removal and detoxification of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) present in dielectric or other fluids, such as transformer oil, employing polyethylene glycol as the primary extractant, cyclohexane as a secondary extractant and a reagent derived from the reaction of sodium or sodium hydroxide, polyethylene glycol and oxygen for the decomposition and detoxification of the PCBs.