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Title: Opportunities for Biorenewables in Oil Refineries

Abstract

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential for using biorenewable feedstocks in oil refineries. Economic analyses were conducted, with support from process modeling and proof of principle experiments, to assess a variety of potential processes and configurations. The study considered two primary alternatives: the production of biodiesel and green diesel from vegetable oils and greases and opportunities for utilization of pyrolysis oil. The study identified a number of promising opportunities for biorenewables in existing or new refining operations.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
UOP LLC
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
861458
Report Number(s):
DOEGO15085Final
TRN: US200716%%356
DOE Contract Number:
FG36-05GO15085
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; ECONOMICS; GREASES; PRODUCTION; PYROLYSIS; REFINING; SIMULATION; VEGETABLE OILS; Biomass; Petroleum; Refining; Co-processing; Pyrolysis; Hydrogen; Oils; Gasoline; Diesel

Citation Formats

Marker, T.L. Opportunities for Biorenewables in Oil Refineries. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.2172/861458.
Marker, T.L. Opportunities for Biorenewables in Oil Refineries. United States. doi:10.2172/861458.
Marker, T.L. Mon . "Opportunities for Biorenewables in Oil Refineries". United States. doi:10.2172/861458. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/861458.
@article{osti_861458,
title = {Opportunities for Biorenewables in Oil Refineries},
author = {Marker, T.L.},
abstractNote = {Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential for using biorenewable feedstocks in oil refineries. Economic analyses were conducted, with support from process modeling and proof of principle experiments, to assess a variety of potential processes and configurations. The study considered two primary alternatives: the production of biodiesel and green diesel from vegetable oils and greases and opportunities for utilization of pyrolysis oil. The study identified a number of promising opportunities for biorenewables in existing or new refining operations.},
doi = {10.2172/861458},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Dec 19 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Mon Dec 19 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

Technical Report:

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  • A presentation by UOP based on collaborative work from FY05 using some results from PNNL for upgrading biomass pyrolysis oil to petroleum refinery feedstock
  • a summary of our collaborative 2005 project “Opportunities for Biorenewables in Petroleum Refineries” at the Rio Oil and Gas Conference this September.
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