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Title: John von Neumann Birthday Centennial

Abstract

In celebration of John von Neumann's 100th birthday, a series of four lectures were presented on the evening of February 10, 2003 during the SIAM Conference on Computational Science and Engineering in San Diego. The venue was appropriate because von Neumann spent much of the later part of his life, in the 1950's, as an unofficial ambassador for computational science. He was then the only senior American scientist who had experience with the new computers (digital, electronic, and programmable) and a vision of their future importance. No doubt he would have relished the chance to attend a meeting such as this. The first speaker, William Aspray, described the ''interesting times'' during which computers were invented. His remarks were based on his history [1] of this period in von Neumann's life. We were honored to have John von Neumann's daughter, Marina von Neumann-Whitman, as our second speaker. Other accounts of von Neumann's life can be found in books by two of his colleagues [2] and [3]. Our third speaker, Peter Lax, provided both mathematical and international perspectives on John von Neumann's career. Finally, Pete Stewart spoke about von Neumann's numerical error analysis [4] in the context of later work; this talkmore » did not lend itself to transcription, but readers may consult the historical notes in [5]. Our thanks to all the speakers for a remarkable evening. We are grateful to the DOE Applied Mathematical Sciences (AMS) program for partially supporting these lectures. Thanks are also due to SIAM and William Kolata, to our emcee, Gene Golub, to Paul Saylor for recording and editing, and to Barbara Lytle for the transcriptions. More about von Neumann's work can be learned from the recent American Mathematical Society proceedings [6].« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Director. Office of Science. Office of AdvancedScientific Computing Research
OSTI Identifier:
860971
Report Number(s):
LBNL-57074
R&D Project: K11001; BnR: KJ0101010; TRN: US200601%%556
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: SIAM News; Journal Volume: 38; Journal Issue: 2; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 03/01/2005
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; COMPUTERS; GENES; MARINAS; TRANSCRIPTION; John von Neumann centennial

Citation Formats

Grcar, Joseph F. John von Neumann Birthday Centennial. United States: N. p., 2004. Web.
Grcar, Joseph F. John von Neumann Birthday Centennial. United States.
Grcar, Joseph F. Fri . "John von Neumann Birthday Centennial". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/860971.
@article{osti_860971,
title = {John von Neumann Birthday Centennial},
author = {Grcar, Joseph F.},
abstractNote = {In celebration of John von Neumann's 100th birthday, a series of four lectures were presented on the evening of February 10, 2003 during the SIAM Conference on Computational Science and Engineering in San Diego. The venue was appropriate because von Neumann spent much of the later part of his life, in the 1950's, as an unofficial ambassador for computational science. He was then the only senior American scientist who had experience with the new computers (digital, electronic, and programmable) and a vision of their future importance. No doubt he would have relished the chance to attend a meeting such as this. The first speaker, William Aspray, described the ''interesting times'' during which computers were invented. His remarks were based on his history [1] of this period in von Neumann's life. We were honored to have John von Neumann's daughter, Marina von Neumann-Whitman, as our second speaker. Other accounts of von Neumann's life can be found in books by two of his colleagues [2] and [3]. Our third speaker, Peter Lax, provided both mathematical and international perspectives on John von Neumann's career. Finally, Pete Stewart spoke about von Neumann's numerical error analysis [4] in the context of later work; this talk did not lend itself to transcription, but readers may consult the historical notes in [5]. Our thanks to all the speakers for a remarkable evening. We are grateful to the DOE Applied Mathematical Sciences (AMS) program for partially supporting these lectures. Thanks are also due to SIAM and William Kolata, to our emcee, Gene Golub, to Paul Saylor for recording and editing, and to Barbara Lytle for the transcriptions. More about von Neumann's work can be learned from the recent American Mathematical Society proceedings [6].},
doi = {},
journal = {SIAM News},
number = 2,
volume = 38,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Nov 12 00:00:00 EST 2004},
month = {Fri Nov 12 00:00:00 EST 2004}
}
  • This volume brings together John von Neumann's long-out-of-print articles on computer architecture, programming, large-scale computing, and automata theory. A number of significant papers in these areas that were not included in the multivolume John von Neumann: Collected Works (1963) have now been reprinted here. These pioneering articles - written between the mid-1940s and the mid-1950s - are of enduring value not only to computer historians but to computer scientists at the vanguard of current research. Most of today's computers are still constructed in accordance with the '' von Neumann architecture,'' and his technique of flow charting remains basic in themore » domain.« less
  • A data-flow architecture achieves true concurrent processing and promises to unleash performances beyond those of present supercomputers. Although the standard von Neumann architecture has served computers well, many computation-intensive operations are slowed by constraints inherent in its structure. For that reason, researchers around the world have begun to experiment with new concepts like data-flow architecture and systolic arrays that take a more efficient approach to high-speed number crunching. Until recently, data flow was not much more than a concept on paper. In November, however, the US and European electronics communities were surprised by the announcement of the first working prototypemore » of a VLSI chip that employed a data-flow architecture to perform image processing. Now, NEC Corp. (Kanagawa, Japan) has put its chip to work in an image processing system that runs at speeds equal to those of such supercomputers as the Cray 1.« less
  • We obtain the von Neumann entropy per state of the Haldane exclusion statistics with parameter [ital g] in terms of the mean occupation number [bar n][l brace][ital w]ln[ital w][minus](1+[ital w])ln(1+[ital w])[r brace], where [ital w]=(1[minus][bar n]). This reduces correctly to the well known expressions in the limiting cases of Bose ([ital g]=0) and Fermi ([ital g]=1) statistics. We have derived the second and third order fluctuations in the occupation numbers for arbitrary [ital g]. An elegant general duality relationship between the [ital w] factor associated with the particle and that associated with the hole at the reciprocal [ital g] ismore » deduced along with the attendant relationship between the two respective entropies.« less
  • The von Neumann entropy of N interacting pencils of radiation is analyzed by using their spectral density matrix. When the cross-spectral density is the same for all pairs of pencils, the entropy is evaluated in closed form as a function of Barakat's N-fold polarization measures. Some technical and historical remarks are made concerning the Planck-von Laue entropy of such pencils. 16 refs., 3 figs.