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Title: Manzanita Hybrid Power system Project Final Report

Abstract

The Manzanita Indian Reservation is located in southeastern San Diego County, California. The Tribe has long recognized that the Reservation has an abundant wind resource that could be commercially utilized to its benefit, and in 1995 the Tribe established the Manzanita Renewable Energy Office. Through the U.S. Department of Energy's Tribal Energy Program the Band received funds to install a hybrid renewable power system to provide electricity to one of the tribal community buildings, the Manzanita Activities Center (MAC building). The project began September 30, 1999 and was completed March 31, 2005. The system was designed and the equipment supplied by Northern Power Systems, Inc, an engineering company with expertise in renewable hybrid system design and development. Personnel of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory provided technical assistance in system design, and continued to provide technical assistance in system monitoring. The grid-connected renewable hybrid wind/photovoltaic system provides a demonstration of a solar/wind energy hybrid power-generating project on Manzanita Tribal land. During the system design phase, the National Renewable Energy Lab estimated that the wind turbine is expected to produce 10,000-kilowatt hours per year and the solar array 2,000-kilowatt hours per year. The hybrid system was designed to provide approximately 80 percentmore » of the electricity used annually in the MAC building. The project proposed to demonstrate that this kind of a system design would provide highly reliable renewable power for community uses.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Manzanita Band of the Kumeyaay Nation (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
841361
DOE Contract Number:
FC36-99R810677
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 31 Mar 2005
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 17 WIND ENERGY; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; DESIGN; ELECTRICITY; HYBRID SYSTEMS; MONITORING; NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY; PERSONNEL; POWER SYSTEMS; SOLAR WIND; WIND TURBINES; AMERICAN INDIANS; TRIBAL; RENEWABLE ENERGY; SOLAR; WIND

Citation Formats

Trisha Frank. Manzanita Hybrid Power system Project Final Report. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.2172/841361.
Trisha Frank. Manzanita Hybrid Power system Project Final Report. United States. doi:10.2172/841361.
Trisha Frank. 2005. "Manzanita Hybrid Power system Project Final Report". United States. doi:10.2172/841361. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/841361.
@article{osti_841361,
title = {Manzanita Hybrid Power system Project Final Report},
author = {Trisha Frank},
abstractNote = {The Manzanita Indian Reservation is located in southeastern San Diego County, California. The Tribe has long recognized that the Reservation has an abundant wind resource that could be commercially utilized to its benefit, and in 1995 the Tribe established the Manzanita Renewable Energy Office. Through the U.S. Department of Energy's Tribal Energy Program the Band received funds to install a hybrid renewable power system to provide electricity to one of the tribal community buildings, the Manzanita Activities Center (MAC building). The project began September 30, 1999 and was completed March 31, 2005. The system was designed and the equipment supplied by Northern Power Systems, Inc, an engineering company with expertise in renewable hybrid system design and development. Personnel of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory provided technical assistance in system design, and continued to provide technical assistance in system monitoring. The grid-connected renewable hybrid wind/photovoltaic system provides a demonstration of a solar/wind energy hybrid power-generating project on Manzanita Tribal land. During the system design phase, the National Renewable Energy Lab estimated that the wind turbine is expected to produce 10,000-kilowatt hours per year and the solar array 2,000-kilowatt hours per year. The hybrid system was designed to provide approximately 80 percent of the electricity used annually in the MAC building. The project proposed to demonstrate that this kind of a system design would provide highly reliable renewable power for community uses.},
doi = {10.2172/841361},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2005,
month = 3
}

Technical Report:

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  • The results of an investigation into the use of hybrid computer systems for the solution of problems associated with the generation and transmission of electrical power are summarized. An eighteen-month study was conducted at EAI's Princeton Computation Center to determine if hybrid computing techniues could result in the capability of real time, or faster, transient stability studies. It was determined that a special purpose hybrid system could provide simulations of power system transient disturbances 100 times faster than real time. A working model of the proposed ac/hybrid power system simulator was built which consisted of 5 generators, 15 lines andmore » 12 buses. Tests on this prototype have proven successful, and indicate that 100 times real time transient stability studies can be obtained regardless of the size of the system under study. The proposed simulator could be used for on-line operator advisory functions, optimization of system operating conditions to maximixe security, or eventually for on-line automatic control of electromechanical transients.« less
  • A description of an analysis of hybrid photovoltaic/solar thermal electric conversion systems is summarized. Several types of hybrid systems, photovoltaic-only systems, and solar thermal electric systems were compared in terms of performance and cost. Generally, hybrid systems are shown to be potentially competitive with photovoltaic-only or solar thermal electric conversion systems, but hybrid systems do not appear to have a significant advantage, on a levelized cost per kilowatt-hour basis.
  • An analysis was done of hybrid photovoltaic/solar thermal electric conversion systems. The study compared several types of hybrid systems, photovoltaic-only systems, and solar thermal electric systems in terms of performance and cost. This study and its results are reported in detail in Volume II, and are summarized in Volume I. This third volume consists entirely of supporting appendices, including a description of the computer code used in the analyses and background information on heat engines, thermal efficiencies of photovoltaic thermal collectors, and optical considerations for central receiver plants.
  • An analysis of hybrid photovoltaic/solar thermal electric conversion systems is described in detail. Several types of hybrid systems, photovoltaic-only systems, and solar thermal electric systems were compared in terms of performance and cost. Generally, hybrid systems are shown to be potentially competitive with photovoltaic-only or solar thermal electric conversion systems, but hybrid systems do not appear to have a significant advantage, on a levelized cost per kilowatt-hour basis.
  • A design was developed for a gas combustor with a sodium heat pipe to be coupled with a high-efficiency Stirling Power Conversion System (PCS) for the cogeneration and solar market. The power application ranged between 25 kWe for the solar case and 75 kWe for cogeneration. Economic analysis determined the performance and operating and maintenance requirements for the widest market penetration. The PCS consists of a STM4-120 Stirling engine; solar/gas-fired hybrid receiver; induction generator and grid-interface hardware; cooling system comprising a closed-loop liquid-coolant circuit and a liquid-to-air heat exchanger with fan; control system governing all system function except solar tracking;more » and mechanical interface of the PCS with a particular parabolic collector to be identified. Analysis results and potential applications are discussed in appendices.« less