skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Monitoring the Energy-Use Effects of Cool Roofs on California Commercial Buildings

Abstract

Solar-reflective roofs stay cooler in the sun than solar-absorptive roofs. Such ''cool'' roofs achieve lower surface temperatures that reduce heat conduction into the building and the building's cooling load. The California Energy Commission has funded research in which Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has measured the electricity use and peak demand in commercial buildings to document savings from implementing the Commission's Cool Roofs program. The study seeks to determine the savings achieved by cool roofs by monitoring the energy use of a carefully selected assortment of buildings participating in the Cool Roofs program. Measurements were needed because the peak savings resulting from the application of cool roofs on different types of buildings in the diverse California climate zones have not been well characterized to date. Only a few occupancy categories (e.g., office and retail buildings) have been monitored before this, and those were done under a limited number of climatic conditions. To help rectify this situation, LBNL was tasked to select the buildings to be monitored, measure roof performance before and after replacing a hot roof by a cool roof, and document both energy and peak demand savings resulting from installation of cool roofs. We monitored the effects of coolmore » roofs on energy use and environmental parameters in six California buildings at three different sites: a retail store in Sacramento; an elementary school in San Marcos (near San Diego); and a 4-building cold storage facility in Reedley (near Fresno). The latter included a cold storage building, a conditioning and fruit-palletizing area, a conditioned packing area, and two unconditioned packing areas (counted as one building).« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE. Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; California Energy Commission. Public Interest Energy Research Program under Contracts 400-00-039 and 500-99-013 Work Authorization 20, Task 14 (US)
OSTI Identifier:
840985
Report Number(s):
LBNL-54770
R&D Project: EK252L; TRN: US200513%%209
DOE Contract Number:  
AC03-76SF00098
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Jul 2004
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 25 ENERGY STORAGE; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; CLIMATES; COLD STORAGE; COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS; COOLING LOAD; EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES; ELECTRICITY; HEAT EXCHANGERS; MONITORING; PERFORMANCE; ROOFS; SUN; SOLAR REFLECTORS

Citation Formats

Akbari, Hashem, Levinson, Ronnen, Konopaki, Steve, and Rainer, Leo. Monitoring the Energy-Use Effects of Cool Roofs on California Commercial Buildings. United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.2172/840985.
Akbari, Hashem, Levinson, Ronnen, Konopaki, Steve, & Rainer, Leo. Monitoring the Energy-Use Effects of Cool Roofs on California Commercial Buildings. United States. doi:10.2172/840985.
Akbari, Hashem, Levinson, Ronnen, Konopaki, Steve, and Rainer, Leo. Thu . "Monitoring the Energy-Use Effects of Cool Roofs on California Commercial Buildings". United States. doi:10.2172/840985. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/840985.
@article{osti_840985,
title = {Monitoring the Energy-Use Effects of Cool Roofs on California Commercial Buildings},
author = {Akbari, Hashem and Levinson, Ronnen and Konopaki, Steve and Rainer, Leo},
abstractNote = {Solar-reflective roofs stay cooler in the sun than solar-absorptive roofs. Such ''cool'' roofs achieve lower surface temperatures that reduce heat conduction into the building and the building's cooling load. The California Energy Commission has funded research in which Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has measured the electricity use and peak demand in commercial buildings to document savings from implementing the Commission's Cool Roofs program. The study seeks to determine the savings achieved by cool roofs by monitoring the energy use of a carefully selected assortment of buildings participating in the Cool Roofs program. Measurements were needed because the peak savings resulting from the application of cool roofs on different types of buildings in the diverse California climate zones have not been well characterized to date. Only a few occupancy categories (e.g., office and retail buildings) have been monitored before this, and those were done under a limited number of climatic conditions. To help rectify this situation, LBNL was tasked to select the buildings to be monitored, measure roof performance before and after replacing a hot roof by a cool roof, and document both energy and peak demand savings resulting from installation of cool roofs. We monitored the effects of cool roofs on energy use and environmental parameters in six California buildings at three different sites: a retail store in Sacramento; an elementary school in San Marcos (near San Diego); and a 4-building cold storage facility in Reedley (near Fresno). The latter included a cold storage building, a conditioning and fruit-palletizing area, a conditioned packing area, and two unconditioned packing areas (counted as one building).},
doi = {10.2172/840985},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2004},
month = {7}
}