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Title: Measurements of Omega and Lambda from High-Redshift Supernovae

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; more »; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; « less
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Director, Office of Science (US)
OSTI Identifier:
840560
Report Number(s):
LBNL-41801
TRN: US200512%%101
DOE Contract Number:
AC03-76SF00098
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: The Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 517; Journal Issue: 2 Pt 1; Other Information: Journal Publication Date: 06/01/1999; PBD: 3 Sep 1998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; SUPERNOVAE; RED SHIFT; MEASURING METHODS

Citation Formats

Perlmutter, Saul, Aldering, G., Goldhaber, G., Knop, R.A., Nugent, P., Castro, P.G., Duestua, S., Fabbro, S., Goobar, A., Groom, D.E., Hook, I.M., Kim, A.G., Kim, M.Y., Lee, J.C., Nunes, N.J., Pain, R., Pennypacker, C.R., Quimby, R., Lidman, C., Ellis, R.S., Irwin, M., McMahon, R.G., Ruiz-Lapuente, P., Walton, N., Schaefer, B., Boyle, J.J., Filippenko, A.V., Matheson, T., Fruchter, A.S., Panagia, N., Newberg, H.J.M., and Couch, W.J.. Measurements of Omega and Lambda from High-Redshift Supernovae. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Perlmutter, Saul, Aldering, G., Goldhaber, G., Knop, R.A., Nugent, P., Castro, P.G., Duestua, S., Fabbro, S., Goobar, A., Groom, D.E., Hook, I.M., Kim, A.G., Kim, M.Y., Lee, J.C., Nunes, N.J., Pain, R., Pennypacker, C.R., Quimby, R., Lidman, C., Ellis, R.S., Irwin, M., McMahon, R.G., Ruiz-Lapuente, P., Walton, N., Schaefer, B., Boyle, J.J., Filippenko, A.V., Matheson, T., Fruchter, A.S., Panagia, N., Newberg, H.J.M., & Couch, W.J.. Measurements of Omega and Lambda from High-Redshift Supernovae. United States.
Perlmutter, Saul, Aldering, G., Goldhaber, G., Knop, R.A., Nugent, P., Castro, P.G., Duestua, S., Fabbro, S., Goobar, A., Groom, D.E., Hook, I.M., Kim, A.G., Kim, M.Y., Lee, J.C., Nunes, N.J., Pain, R., Pennypacker, C.R., Quimby, R., Lidman, C., Ellis, R.S., Irwin, M., McMahon, R.G., Ruiz-Lapuente, P., Walton, N., Schaefer, B., Boyle, J.J., Filippenko, A.V., Matheson, T., Fruchter, A.S., Panagia, N., Newberg, H.J.M., and Couch, W.J.. Thu . "Measurements of Omega and Lambda from High-Redshift Supernovae". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_840560,
title = {Measurements of Omega and Lambda from High-Redshift Supernovae},
author = {Perlmutter, Saul and Aldering, G. and Goldhaber, G. and Knop, R.A. and Nugent, P. and Castro, P.G. and Duestua, S. and Fabbro, S. and Goobar, A. and Groom, D.E. and Hook, I.M. and Kim, A.G. and Kim, M.Y. and Lee, J.C. and Nunes, N.J. and Pain, R. and Pennypacker, C.R. and Quimby, R. and Lidman, C. and Ellis, R.S. and Irwin, M. and McMahon, R.G. and Ruiz-Lapuente, P. and Walton, N. and Schaefer, B. and Boyle, J.J. and Filippenko, A.V. and Matheson, T. and Fruchter, A.S. and Panagia, N. and Newberg, H.J.M. and Couch, W.J.},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {The Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2 Pt 1,
volume = 517,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Sep 03 00:00:00 EDT 1998},
month = {Thu Sep 03 00:00:00 EDT 1998}
}
  • We report measurements of the mass density, [Omega][sub M], and cosmological-constant energy density, [Omega][sub [Lambda]], of the universe based on the analysis of 42 type Ia supernovae discovered by the Supernova Cosmology Project. The magnitude-redshift data for these supernovae, at redshifts between 0.18 and 0.83, are fitted jointly with a set of supernovae from the Cal[acute a]n/Tololo Supernova Survey, at redshifts below 0.1, to yield values for the cosmological parameters. All supernova peak magnitudes are standardized using a SN Ia light-curve width-luminosity relation. The measurement yields a joint probability distribution of the cosmological parameters that is approximated by the relationmore » 0.8[Omega][sub M] [minus]0.6[Omega][sub [Lambda]] [approx][minus]0.2[plus minus]0.1 in the region of interest ([Omega][sub M] [approx lt]1.5). For a flat ([Omega][sub M] [plus][Omega][sub [Lambda]] =1) cosmology we find [Omega][sup flat] [sub M] =0.28[sup [plus]0.09] [sub [minus]0.08] (1 [sigma] statistical) [sup [plus]0.05] [sub [minus]0.04] (identified systematics). The data are strongly inconsistent with a [Lambda]=0 flat cosmology, the simplest inflationary universe model. An open, [Lambda]=0 cosmology also does not fit the data well: the data indicate that the cosmological constant is nonzero and positive, with a confidence of P([Lambda][gt]0)=99[percent], including the identified systematic uncertainties. The best-fit age of the universe relative to the Hubble time is t[sup flat] [sub 0] =14.9[sup [plus]1.4] [sub [minus]1.1] (0.63/h) Gyr for a flat cosmology. The size of our sample allows us to perform a variety of statistical tests to check for possible systematic errors and biases. We find no significant differences in either the host reddening distribution or Malmquist bias between the low-redshift Cal[acute a]n/Tololo sample and our high-redshift sample. Excluding those few supernovae that are outliers in color excess or fit residual does not significantly change the results. The conclusions are also robust whether or not a width-luminosity relation is used to standardize the supernova peak magnitudes. We discuss and constrain, where possible, hypothetical alternatives to a cosmological constant. [copyright] [ital [copyright] 1999.] [ital The American Astronomical Society]« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • We have developed a technique to systematically discover and study high-redshift supernovae that can be used to measure the cosmological parameters. We report here results based on the initial seven of more than 28 supernovae discovered to date in the high-redshift supernova search of the Supernova Cosmology Project. We find an observational dispersion in peak magnitudes of {sigma}{sub M{sub B}}=0.27; this dispersion narrows to {sigma}M{sub B},corr=0.19 after correcting the magnitudes using the light-curve width-luminosity relation found for nearby (z{le}0.1) Type Ia supernovae from the Calan/Tololo survey (Hamuy et al.). Comparing light-curve width-corrected magnitudes as a function of redshift of ourmore » distant (z=0.35{endash}0.46) supernovae to those of nearby Type Ia supernovae yields a global measurement of the mass density, {Omega}{sub M}=0.88{sub {minus}0.60}{sup +0.69} for a {Lambda}=0 cosmology. For a spatially flat universe (i.e., {Omega}{sub M}+{Omega}{sub {Lambda}}=1) we find {Omega}{sub M}=0.94{sub {minus}0.28}{sup +0.34} or, equivalently, a measurement of the cosmological constant, {Omega}{sub {Lambda}}=0.06{sub {minus}0.34}{sup +0.28} ({lt}0.51 at the 95{percent} confidence level). For the more general Friedmann-Lemaitre cosmologies with independent {Omega}{sub M} and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}}, the results are presented as a confidence region on the {Omega}{sub M}{endash}{Omega}{sub {Lambda}} plane. This region does not correspond to a unique value of the deceleration parameter q{sub 0}. We present analyses and checks for statistical and systematic errors and also show that our results do not depend on the specifics of the width-luminosity correction. The results for {Omega}{sub {Lambda}}-versus-{Omega}{sub M} are inconsistent with {Lambda}-dominated, low-density, flat cosmologies that have been proposed to reconcile the ages of globular cluster stars with higher Hubble constant values. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Astronomical Society}« less
  • We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The adopted sample of supernovae (SNe) includes 516 SNe Ia at redshift z {approx}< 0.3, of which 270 (52%) are spectroscopically identified as SNe Ia. The remaining 246 SNe Ia were identified through their light curves; 113 of these objects have spectroscopic redshifts from spectra of their host galaxy, and 133 have photometric redshifts estimated from the SN light curves. Based on consideration of 87 spectroscopically confirmed non-Ia SNe discovered by the SDSS-II SNmore » Survey, we estimate that 2.04{sub -0.95}{sup +1.61}% of the photometric SNe Ia may be misidentified. The sample of SNe Ia used in this measurement represents an order of magnitude increase in the statistics for SN Ia rate measurements in the redshift range covered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. If we assume a SN Ia rate that is constant at low redshift (z < 0.15), then the SN observations can be used to infer a value of the SN rate of r{sub V} = (2.69{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.34+0.21}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} at a mean redshift of {approx} 0.12, based on 79 SNe Ia of which 72 are spectroscopically confirmed. However, the large sample of SNe Ia included in this study allows us to place constraints on the redshift dependence of the SN Ia rate based on the SDSS-II Supernova Survey data alone. Fitting a power-law model of the SN rate evolution, r{sub V} (z) = A{sub p} x ((1+z)/(1+z{sub 0})){sup {nu}}, over the redshift range 0.0 < z < 0.3 with z{sub 0} = 0.21, results in A{sub p} = (3.43{sub -0.15}{sup +0.15}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} and {nu} = 2.04{sub -0.89}{sup +0.90}.« less