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Title: Waste Issues Associated with the Safe Movement of Hazardous Chemicals

Abstract

Moving hazardous chemicals presents the risk of exposure for workers engaged in the activity and others that might be in the immediate area. Adverse affects are specific to the chemicals and can range from minor skin, eye, or mucous membrane irritation, to burns, respiratory distress, nervous system dysfunction, or even death. A case study is presented where in the interest of waste minimization; original shipping packaging was removed from a glass bottle of nitric acid, while moving corrosive liquid through a security protocol into a Radiological Control Area (RCA). During the transfer, the glass bottle broke. The resulting release of nitric acid possibly exposed 12 employees with one employee being admitted overnight at a hospital for observation. This is a clear example of administrative controls to reduce the generation of suspect radioactive waste being implemented at the expense of employee health. As a result of this event, material handling procedures that assure the safe movement of hazardous chemicals through a security protocol into a radiological control area were developed. Specifically, hazardous material must be transferred using original shipping containers and packaging. While this represents the potential to increase the generation of suspect radioactive waste in a radiological controlled area, argumentsmore » are presented that justify this change. Security protocols for accidental releases are also discussed. In summary, the 12th rule of ''Green Chemistry'' (Inherently Safer Chemistry for Accident Prevention) should be followed: the form of a substance used in a chemical process (Movement of Hazardous Chemicals) should be chosen to minimize the potential for chemical accidents, including releases.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
833220
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Waste Management 2002 Symposium, Tucson, AZ (US), 02/24/2002--02/28/2002; Other Information: PBD: 26 Feb 2002
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; ACCIDENTS; CHEMISTRY; CONTAINERS; CONTROLLED AREAS; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; MINIMIZATION; MUCOUS MEMBRANES; NERVOUS SYSTEM; NITRIC ACID; PACKAGING; PERSONNEL; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; SECURITY; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTES

Citation Formats

Dare, J. H., and Cournoyer, M. E. Waste Issues Associated with the Safe Movement of Hazardous Chemicals. United States: N. p., 2002. Web.
Dare, J. H., & Cournoyer, M. E. Waste Issues Associated with the Safe Movement of Hazardous Chemicals. United States.
Dare, J. H., and Cournoyer, M. E. Tue . "Waste Issues Associated with the Safe Movement of Hazardous Chemicals". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/833220.
@article{osti_833220,
title = {Waste Issues Associated with the Safe Movement of Hazardous Chemicals},
author = {Dare, J. H. and Cournoyer, M. E.},
abstractNote = {Moving hazardous chemicals presents the risk of exposure for workers engaged in the activity and others that might be in the immediate area. Adverse affects are specific to the chemicals and can range from minor skin, eye, or mucous membrane irritation, to burns, respiratory distress, nervous system dysfunction, or even death. A case study is presented where in the interest of waste minimization; original shipping packaging was removed from a glass bottle of nitric acid, while moving corrosive liquid through a security protocol into a Radiological Control Area (RCA). During the transfer, the glass bottle broke. The resulting release of nitric acid possibly exposed 12 employees with one employee being admitted overnight at a hospital for observation. This is a clear example of administrative controls to reduce the generation of suspect radioactive waste being implemented at the expense of employee health. As a result of this event, material handling procedures that assure the safe movement of hazardous chemicals through a security protocol into a radiological control area were developed. Specifically, hazardous material must be transferred using original shipping containers and packaging. While this represents the potential to increase the generation of suspect radioactive waste in a radiological controlled area, arguments are presented that justify this change. Security protocols for accidental releases are also discussed. In summary, the 12th rule of ''Green Chemistry'' (Inherently Safer Chemistry for Accident Prevention) should be followed: the form of a substance used in a chemical process (Movement of Hazardous Chemicals) should be chosen to minimize the potential for chemical accidents, including releases.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2002},
month = {2}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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