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Title: Adsorption of radon and water vapor on commercial activated carbons

Abstract

Equilibrium adsorption isotherms are reported for radon and water vapor on two commercial activated carbons: coconut shell Type PCB and hardwood Type BD. The isotherms of the water vapor were measured gravimetrically at 298 K. The isotherms of radon from dry nitrogen were obtained at 293, 298, and 308 K while the data for the mixture of radon and water vapor were measured at 298 K. The concentrations of radon in the gas and solid phases were measured simultaneously, once the adsorption equilibrium and the radioactive equilibrium between the radon and its daughter products were established. The shape of the isotherms was of Type III for the radon and Type V for the water vapor, according to Brunauer`s classification. The adsorption mechanism was similar for both the radon and the water vapor, being physical adsorption on the macropore surface area in the low pressure region and micropore filling near saturation pressure. The uptake capacity of radon decreased both with increasing temperature and relative humidity. The heat of adsorption data indicated that the PCB- and the BD-activated carbons provided a heterogeneous surface for radon adsorption. The equilibrium data for radon were correlated with a modified Freundlich equation.

Authors:
 [1]; ; ;  [2]
  1. Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)
  2. Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
83266
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Separation Science and Technology; Journal Volume: 30; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: PBD: Feb 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
40 CHEMISTRY; RADON; ADSORPTION; WATER; ACTIVATED CARBON; SORPTIVE PROPERTIES; WATER VAPOR; EQUILIBRIUM; ADSORPTION ISOTHERMS; GRAVIMETRY

Citation Formats

Hassan, N.M., Ghosh, T.K., Hines, A.L., and Loyalka, S.K.. Adsorption of radon and water vapor on commercial activated carbons. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.1080/01496399508225610.
Hassan, N.M., Ghosh, T.K., Hines, A.L., & Loyalka, S.K.. Adsorption of radon and water vapor on commercial activated carbons. United States. doi:10.1080/01496399508225610.
Hassan, N.M., Ghosh, T.K., Hines, A.L., and Loyalka, S.K.. 1995. "Adsorption of radon and water vapor on commercial activated carbons". United States. doi:10.1080/01496399508225610.
@article{osti_83266,
title = {Adsorption of radon and water vapor on commercial activated carbons},
author = {Hassan, N.M. and Ghosh, T.K. and Hines, A.L. and Loyalka, S.K.},
abstractNote = {Equilibrium adsorption isotherms are reported for radon and water vapor on two commercial activated carbons: coconut shell Type PCB and hardwood Type BD. The isotherms of the water vapor were measured gravimetrically at 298 K. The isotherms of radon from dry nitrogen were obtained at 293, 298, and 308 K while the data for the mixture of radon and water vapor were measured at 298 K. The concentrations of radon in the gas and solid phases were measured simultaneously, once the adsorption equilibrium and the radioactive equilibrium between the radon and its daughter products were established. The shape of the isotherms was of Type III for the radon and Type V for the water vapor, according to Brunauer`s classification. The adsorption mechanism was similar for both the radon and the water vapor, being physical adsorption on the macropore surface area in the low pressure region and micropore filling near saturation pressure. The uptake capacity of radon decreased both with increasing temperature and relative humidity. The heat of adsorption data indicated that the PCB- and the BD-activated carbons provided a heterogeneous surface for radon adsorption. The equilibrium data for radon were correlated with a modified Freundlich equation.},
doi = {10.1080/01496399508225610},
journal = {Separation Science and Technology},
number = 4,
volume = 30,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month = 2
}
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