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Title: MEMBRANE SYSTEM FOR RECOVERY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM REMEDIATION OFF-GASES

Abstract

In situ vacuum extraction, air or steam sparging, and vitrification are widely used to remediate soil contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). All of these processes produce a VOC-laden air stream from which the VOC must be removed before the air can be discharged or recycled to the generating process. Treatment of these off-gases is often a major portion of the cost of the remediation project. Currently, carbon adsorption and catalytic incineration are the most common methods of treating these gas streams. Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) proposed an alternative treatment technology based on selective membranes that separate the organic components from the gas stream, producing a VOC-free air stream. This technology can be applied to off-gases produced by various remediation activities and the systems can be skid-mounted and automated for easy transportation and unattended operation. The target performance for the membrane systems is to produce clean air (less than 10 ppmv VOC) for discharge or recycle, dischargeable water (less than 1 ppmw VOC), and a concentrated liquid VOC phase. This report contains the results obtained during Phase II of a two-phase project. In Phase I, laboratory experiments were carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach.more » In the subsequent Phase II project, a demonstration system was built and operated at the McClellan Air Force Base near Sacramento, California. The membrane system was fed with off-gas from a Soil Vacuum Extraction (SVE) system. The work performed in Phase II demonstrated that the membrane system can reduce the VOC concentration in remediation off-gas to 10 ppmv, while producing a concentrated VOC phase and dischargeable water containing less than 1 ppmw VOC. However, the tests showed that the presence of 1 to 3% carbon dioxide in the SVE off-gas reduced the treatment capacity of the system by a factor of three to four. In an economic analysis, treatment costs of the membrane system were compared with those of catalytic oxidation and carbon adsorption. This analysis showed that the treatment costs of the membrane system are higher than those of the competing technologies in the VOC concentration range up to 1%. Catalytic oxidation is the most economical treatment technology for off-gases containing VOCs in the range 50 ppmv to 1%, whereas carbon adsorption (off-site regeneration) is the most economical for VOC concentrations less than 50 ppmv. Because the VOC concentration in the vast majority of remediation off-gases is below 1%, we conclude that the usefulness of membrane VOC-separation systems for remediation applications will be very limited.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
(US)
OSTI Identifier:
822892
DOE Contract Number:  
AR21-96MC33081
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 17 Nov 2003
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; ADSORPTION; CAPACITY; CARBON; CARBON DIOXIDE; COMBUSTION; ECONOMIC ANALYSIS; MEMBRANES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OXIDATION; REGENERATION; SOILS; STEAM; TARGETS; VITRIFICATION; VOLATILE MATTER

Citation Formats

J.G. Wijmans. MEMBRANE SYSTEM FOR RECOVERY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM REMEDIATION OFF-GASES. United States: N. p., 2003. Web. doi:10.2172/822892.
J.G. Wijmans. MEMBRANE SYSTEM FOR RECOVERY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM REMEDIATION OFF-GASES. United States. doi:10.2172/822892.
J.G. Wijmans. Mon . "MEMBRANE SYSTEM FOR RECOVERY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM REMEDIATION OFF-GASES". United States. doi:10.2172/822892. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/822892.
@article{osti_822892,
title = {MEMBRANE SYSTEM FOR RECOVERY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM REMEDIATION OFF-GASES},
author = {J.G. Wijmans},
abstractNote = {In situ vacuum extraction, air or steam sparging, and vitrification are widely used to remediate soil contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). All of these processes produce a VOC-laden air stream from which the VOC must be removed before the air can be discharged or recycled to the generating process. Treatment of these off-gases is often a major portion of the cost of the remediation project. Currently, carbon adsorption and catalytic incineration are the most common methods of treating these gas streams. Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) proposed an alternative treatment technology based on selective membranes that separate the organic components from the gas stream, producing a VOC-free air stream. This technology can be applied to off-gases produced by various remediation activities and the systems can be skid-mounted and automated for easy transportation and unattended operation. The target performance for the membrane systems is to produce clean air (less than 10 ppmv VOC) for discharge or recycle, dischargeable water (less than 1 ppmw VOC), and a concentrated liquid VOC phase. This report contains the results obtained during Phase II of a two-phase project. In Phase I, laboratory experiments were carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach. In the subsequent Phase II project, a demonstration system was built and operated at the McClellan Air Force Base near Sacramento, California. The membrane system was fed with off-gas from a Soil Vacuum Extraction (SVE) system. The work performed in Phase II demonstrated that the membrane system can reduce the VOC concentration in remediation off-gas to 10 ppmv, while producing a concentrated VOC phase and dischargeable water containing less than 1 ppmw VOC. However, the tests showed that the presence of 1 to 3% carbon dioxide in the SVE off-gas reduced the treatment capacity of the system by a factor of three to four. In an economic analysis, treatment costs of the membrane system were compared with those of catalytic oxidation and carbon adsorption. This analysis showed that the treatment costs of the membrane system are higher than those of the competing technologies in the VOC concentration range up to 1%. Catalytic oxidation is the most economical treatment technology for off-gases containing VOCs in the range 50 ppmv to 1%, whereas carbon adsorption (off-site regeneration) is the most economical for VOC concentrations less than 50 ppmv. Because the VOC concentration in the vast majority of remediation off-gases is below 1%, we conclude that the usefulness of membrane VOC-separation systems for remediation applications will be very limited.},
doi = {10.2172/822892},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2003},
month = {11}
}