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Title: Energy Consumption of Die Casting Operations

Abstract

Molten metal processing is inherently energy intensive and roughly 25% of the cost of die-cast products can be traced to some form of energy consumption [1]. The obvious major energy requirements are for melting and holding molten alloy in preparation for casting. The proper selection and maintenance of melting and holding equipment are clearly important factors in minimizing energy consumption in die-casting operations [2]. In addition to energy consumption, furnace selection also influences metal loss due to oxidation, metal quality, and maintenance requirements. Other important factors influencing energy consumption in a die-casting facility include geographic location, alloy(s) cast, starting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting machine, related equipment (robots, trim presses), and downstream processing (machining, plating, assembly, etc.). Each of these factors also may influence the casting quality and productivity of a die-casting enterprise. In a die-casting enterprise, decisions regarding these issues are made frequently andmore » are based on a large number of factors. Therefore, it is not surprising that energy consumption can vary significantly from one die-casting enterprise to the next, and within a single enterprise as function of time.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
The Ohio State University (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
(US)
OSTI Identifier:
822409
Report Number(s):
DOE/ID/13843
TRN: US200413%%82
DOE Contract Number:  
FC07-00ID13843
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 15 Mar 2004
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ALLOYS; CASTING; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; FURNACES; MACHINING; MAINTENANCE; MELTING; OXIDATION; PLATING; PROCESSING; PRODUCTIVITY; ROBOTS; SCRAP

Citation Formats

Jerald Brevick, clark Mount-Campbell, and Carroll Mobley. Energy Consumption of Die Casting Operations. United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.2172/822409.
Jerald Brevick, clark Mount-Campbell, & Carroll Mobley. Energy Consumption of Die Casting Operations. United States. doi:10.2172/822409.
Jerald Brevick, clark Mount-Campbell, and Carroll Mobley. Mon . "Energy Consumption of Die Casting Operations". United States. doi:10.2172/822409. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/822409.
@article{osti_822409,
title = {Energy Consumption of Die Casting Operations},
author = {Jerald Brevick and clark Mount-Campbell and Carroll Mobley},
abstractNote = {Molten metal processing is inherently energy intensive and roughly 25% of the cost of die-cast products can be traced to some form of energy consumption [1]. The obvious major energy requirements are for melting and holding molten alloy in preparation for casting. The proper selection and maintenance of melting and holding equipment are clearly important factors in minimizing energy consumption in die-casting operations [2]. In addition to energy consumption, furnace selection also influences metal loss due to oxidation, metal quality, and maintenance requirements. Other important factors influencing energy consumption in a die-casting facility include geographic location, alloy(s) cast, starting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting machine, related equipment (robots, trim presses), and downstream processing (machining, plating, assembly, etc.). Each of these factors also may influence the casting quality and productivity of a die-casting enterprise. In a die-casting enterprise, decisions regarding these issues are made frequently and are based on a large number of factors. Therefore, it is not surprising that energy consumption can vary significantly from one die-casting enterprise to the next, and within a single enterprise as function of time.},
doi = {10.2172/822409},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2004},
month = {Mon Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2004}
}

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