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Title: IRIS Final Technical Progress Report

Abstract

OAK-B135 This NERI project, originally started as the Secure Transportable Autonomous Light Water Reactor (STAR-LW) and currently known as the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) project, had the objective of investigating a novel type of water-cooled reactor to satisfy the Generation IV goals: fuel cycle sustainability, enhanced reliability and safety, and improved economics. The research objectives over the three-year (1999-2002) program were as follows: First year: Assess various design alternatives and establish main characteristics of a point design; Second year: Perform feasibility and engineering assessment of the selected design solutions; Third year: Complete reactor design and performance evaluation, including cost assessment These objectives were fully attained and actually they served to launch IRIS as a full fledged project for eventual commercial deployment. The program did not terminate in 2002 at the end of the NERI program, and has just entered in its fifth year. This has been made possible by the IRIS project participants which have grown from the original four member, two-countries team to the current twenty members, nine countries consortium. All the consortium members work under their own funding and it is estimated that the value of their in-kind contributions over the life of the project hasmore » been of the order of $30M. Currently, approximately 100 people worldwide are involved in the project. A very important constituency of the IRIS project is the academia: 7 universities from four countries are members of the consortium and five more US universities are associated via parallel NERI programs. To date, 97 students have worked or are working on IRIS; 59 IRIS-related graduate theses have been prepared or are in preparation, and 41 of these students have already graduated with M.S. (33) or Ph.D. (8) degrees. This ''final'' report (final only as far as the NERI program is concerned) summarizes the work performed in the first four years of IRIS, from October 1999 to October 2003. It provides a panoramic of the project status and design effort, with emphasis on the current status, since two previous reports have very extensively documented the work performed, from inception to early 2002.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (NE) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
816832
Report Number(s):
DOE/SF21901-3
STD-ES-03-40; TRN: US0305336
DOE Contract Number:  
FG03-99SF21901
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 3 Nov 2003
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; DESIGN; ECONOMICS; EVALUATION; FUEL CYCLE; PERFORMANCE; PROGRESS REPORT; RELIABILITY; SAFETY; WATER; WATER COOLED REACTORS; IRIS; INTEGRAL REACTORS; ADVANCED NUCLEAR PLANTS

Citation Formats

M. D. Carelli. IRIS Final Technical Progress Report. United States: N. p., 2003. Web. doi:10.2172/816832.
M. D. Carelli. IRIS Final Technical Progress Report. United States. doi:10.2172/816832.
M. D. Carelli. Mon . "IRIS Final Technical Progress Report". United States. doi:10.2172/816832. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/816832.
@article{osti_816832,
title = {IRIS Final Technical Progress Report},
author = {M. D. Carelli},
abstractNote = {OAK-B135 This NERI project, originally started as the Secure Transportable Autonomous Light Water Reactor (STAR-LW) and currently known as the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) project, had the objective of investigating a novel type of water-cooled reactor to satisfy the Generation IV goals: fuel cycle sustainability, enhanced reliability and safety, and improved economics. The research objectives over the three-year (1999-2002) program were as follows: First year: Assess various design alternatives and establish main characteristics of a point design; Second year: Perform feasibility and engineering assessment of the selected design solutions; Third year: Complete reactor design and performance evaluation, including cost assessment These objectives were fully attained and actually they served to launch IRIS as a full fledged project for eventual commercial deployment. The program did not terminate in 2002 at the end of the NERI program, and has just entered in its fifth year. This has been made possible by the IRIS project participants which have grown from the original four member, two-countries team to the current twenty members, nine countries consortium. All the consortium members work under their own funding and it is estimated that the value of their in-kind contributions over the life of the project has been of the order of $30M. Currently, approximately 100 people worldwide are involved in the project. A very important constituency of the IRIS project is the academia: 7 universities from four countries are members of the consortium and five more US universities are associated via parallel NERI programs. To date, 97 students have worked or are working on IRIS; 59 IRIS-related graduate theses have been prepared or are in preparation, and 41 of these students have already graduated with M.S. (33) or Ph.D. (8) degrees. This ''final'' report (final only as far as the NERI program is concerned) summarizes the work performed in the first four years of IRIS, from October 1999 to October 2003. It provides a panoramic of the project status and design effort, with emphasis on the current status, since two previous reports have very extensively documented the work performed, from inception to early 2002.},
doi = {10.2172/816832},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2003},
month = {11}
}