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Title: Cost benefit analysis of the night-time ventilative cooling in office building

Abstract

The indoor temperature can be controlled with different levels of accuracy depending on the building and its HVAC system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential productivity benefits of improved temperature control, and to apply the information for a cost-benefit analyses of night-time ventilative cooling, which is a very energy efficient method of reducing indoor daytime temperatures. We analyzed the literature relating work performance with temperature, and found a general decrement in work performance when temperatures exceeded those associated with thermal neutrality. These studies included physiological modelling, performance of various tasks in laboratory experiments and measured productivity at work in real buildings. The studies indicate an average 2% decrement in work performance per degree C temperature rise, when the temperature is above 25 C. When we use this relationship to evaluate night-time ventilative cooling, the resulting benefit to cost ratio varies from 32 to 120.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
U.S. DOE. Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technologies; the Finnish Technology Agency and the Finnish Work Environment Fund, Project Productive Office 2005. (US)
OSTI Identifier:
813396
Report Number(s):
LBNL-53191
R&D Project: 474508; TRN: US200316%%184
DOE Contract Number:
AC03-76SF00098
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Healthy Buildings 2003 Conference, Singapore (SG), 12/07/2003--12/11/2003; Other Information: PBD: 1 Jun 2003
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; ACCURACY; COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS; HVAC SYSTEMS; OFFICE BUILDINGS; PERFORMANCE; PRODUCTIVITY; TEMPERATURE CONTROL

Citation Formats

Seppanen, Olli, Fisk, William J., and Faulkner, David. Cost benefit analysis of the night-time ventilative cooling in office building. United States: N. p., 2003. Web.
Seppanen, Olli, Fisk, William J., & Faulkner, David. Cost benefit analysis of the night-time ventilative cooling in office building. United States.
Seppanen, Olli, Fisk, William J., and Faulkner, David. Sun . "Cost benefit analysis of the night-time ventilative cooling in office building". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/813396.
@article{osti_813396,
title = {Cost benefit analysis of the night-time ventilative cooling in office building},
author = {Seppanen, Olli and Fisk, William J. and Faulkner, David},
abstractNote = {The indoor temperature can be controlled with different levels of accuracy depending on the building and its HVAC system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential productivity benefits of improved temperature control, and to apply the information for a cost-benefit analyses of night-time ventilative cooling, which is a very energy efficient method of reducing indoor daytime temperatures. We analyzed the literature relating work performance with temperature, and found a general decrement in work performance when temperatures exceeded those associated with thermal neutrality. These studies included physiological modelling, performance of various tasks in laboratory experiments and measured productivity at work in real buildings. The studies indicate an average 2% decrement in work performance per degree C temperature rise, when the temperature is above 25 C. When we use this relationship to evaluate night-time ventilative cooling, the resulting benefit to cost ratio varies from 32 to 120.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2003},
month = {Sun Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2003}
}

Conference:
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