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Title: PFP Regulatory approach for deactivation and dismantlement

Abstract

The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Nuclear Material Stabilization (NMS) Project is providing for the stabilization, storage, repackaging, and shipment of plutonium bearing materials, spent nuclear fuels, and other nuclear materials to alternate locations for reuse, storage, or disposal. As material is removed from individual facilities, these facilities become candidates for deactivation and dismantlement. This document reviews the alternatives and identifies the approach for compliance with environmental regulations that will be used to decommission facilities at PFP. It will be used as a planning tool to aid in development of a revised program baseline, i.e., Integrated Project Management Plan (IF'MP). The current baseline schedule calls for completion of decommissioning in FY 2016. The approach described in this document supports the existing baseline, but also provides tools to allow project completion by FY 2009. Hold up removal is adequately addressed in the PFP Stabilization FEIS (DOE 1996). Certain activities, such as packaging legacy hold up waste into pipe overpack containers, could be addressed through supplemental analysis to the existing Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). This document assumes that deactivation will include the removal of process equipment, such as gloveboxes, vacuum systems, contaminated ductwork and hoods, and other process systems. Deactivation also provides decontamination,more » isolation of services, and all other activities necessary to allow dismantlement. Dismantlement involves the removal of those parts of the facility that remain after deactivation. In general, the strategy will be to perform deactivation, documented through the appropriate National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. Dismantlement will be conducted primarily under Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) and documented as a removal activity through an Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA). Decommissioning, for the purposes of this document, includes both deactivation and dismantlement.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
FH (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
808231
Report Number(s):
HNF-11955, Rev.0
EDT-634776; TRN: US0302250
DOE Contract Number:  
AC06-96RL13200
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 14 Aug 2002
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; DEACTIVATION; DECOMMISSIONING; DECONTAMINATION; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENTS; GLOVEBOXES; NUCLEAR FUELS; PROGRAM MANAGEMENT; SPENT FUELS; US NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT; US SUPERFUND; VACUUM SYSTEMS

Citation Formats

KELLY, J W. PFP Regulatory approach for deactivation and dismantlement. United States: N. p., 2002. Web. doi:10.2172/808231.
KELLY, J W. PFP Regulatory approach for deactivation and dismantlement. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/808231
KELLY, J W. Wed . "PFP Regulatory approach for deactivation and dismantlement". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/808231. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/808231.
@article{osti_808231,
title = {PFP Regulatory approach for deactivation and dismantlement},
author = {KELLY, J W},
abstractNote = {The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Nuclear Material Stabilization (NMS) Project is providing for the stabilization, storage, repackaging, and shipment of plutonium bearing materials, spent nuclear fuels, and other nuclear materials to alternate locations for reuse, storage, or disposal. As material is removed from individual facilities, these facilities become candidates for deactivation and dismantlement. This document reviews the alternatives and identifies the approach for compliance with environmental regulations that will be used to decommission facilities at PFP. It will be used as a planning tool to aid in development of a revised program baseline, i.e., Integrated Project Management Plan (IF'MP). The current baseline schedule calls for completion of decommissioning in FY 2016. The approach described in this document supports the existing baseline, but also provides tools to allow project completion by FY 2009. Hold up removal is adequately addressed in the PFP Stabilization FEIS (DOE 1996). Certain activities, such as packaging legacy hold up waste into pipe overpack containers, could be addressed through supplemental analysis to the existing Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). This document assumes that deactivation will include the removal of process equipment, such as gloveboxes, vacuum systems, contaminated ductwork and hoods, and other process systems. Deactivation also provides decontamination, isolation of services, and all other activities necessary to allow dismantlement. Dismantlement involves the removal of those parts of the facility that remain after deactivation. In general, the strategy will be to perform deactivation, documented through the appropriate National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. Dismantlement will be conducted primarily under Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) and documented as a removal activity through an Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA). Decommissioning, for the purposes of this document, includes both deactivation and dismantlement.},
doi = {10.2172/808231},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/808231}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2002},
month = {8}
}