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Title: Influences of Herbivory and Canopy Opening Size on Forest Regeneration in a Southern Bottomland Hardwood Forest

Abstract

Examination of the effects on white-tail deer browsing and canopy opening size on relative abundance and diversity of woody and herbaceous regeneration in various sized forest openings in a Southern bottomland hardwood forest over three growing seasons (1995-1997). Herbaceous richness, diversity or evenness did not differ among exclosure types in any year of the study. Overall browsing rates on both woody and herbaceous vegetation were low throughout all the three years of the study. Low browsing rates reflect seasonal changes in habitat use by deer. Other factors may have influenced the initial vegetative response more than herbivory or gap size.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
(US)
OSTI Identifier:
807946
DOE Contract Number:
AI09-00SR22188
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Forest Ecology and Management; Journal Volume: 131; Other Information: PBD: 6 Jul 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ABUNDANCE; DEER; FORESTS; HABITAT; TREES; REVEGETATION; CANOPIES; HERBS; SOUTH CAROLINA; WHITE-TAILED DEER; HERBIVORY; GROUP SELECTION; BOTTOMLAND HARDWOODS; REGENERATION; ODOCOILEUS VIRGINIANUS; CANOPY OPENING SIZE; BROWSING; GAP SIZE

Citation Formats

Castleberry, S.B., Ford, W.M., Miller, K.V., and Smith, W.P. Influences of Herbivory and Canopy Opening Size on Forest Regeneration in a Southern Bottomland Hardwood Forest. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Castleberry, S.B., Ford, W.M., Miller, K.V., & Smith, W.P. Influences of Herbivory and Canopy Opening Size on Forest Regeneration in a Southern Bottomland Hardwood Forest. United States.
Castleberry, S.B., Ford, W.M., Miller, K.V., and Smith, W.P. Tue . "Influences of Herbivory and Canopy Opening Size on Forest Regeneration in a Southern Bottomland Hardwood Forest". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_807946,
title = {Influences of Herbivory and Canopy Opening Size on Forest Regeneration in a Southern Bottomland Hardwood Forest},
author = {Castleberry, S.B. and Ford, W.M. and Miller, K.V. and Smith, W.P.},
abstractNote = {Examination of the effects on white-tail deer browsing and canopy opening size on relative abundance and diversity of woody and herbaceous regeneration in various sized forest openings in a Southern bottomland hardwood forest over three growing seasons (1995-1997). Herbaceous richness, diversity or evenness did not differ among exclosure types in any year of the study. Overall browsing rates on both woody and herbaceous vegetation were low throughout all the three years of the study. Low browsing rates reflect seasonal changes in habitat use by deer. Other factors may have influenced the initial vegetative response more than herbivory or gap size.},
doi = {},
journal = {Forest Ecology and Management},
number = ,
volume = 131,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jul 06 00:00:00 EDT 1999},
month = {Tue Jul 06 00:00:00 EDT 1999}
}
  • Horn, Scott, James L. Hanula, Michael D. Ulyshen, and John C. Kilgo. 2005. Abundance of green tree frogs and insects in artificial canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest. Am. Midl. Nat. 153:321-326. Abstract: We found more green tree frogs (Hyla cinerea) in canopy gaps than in closed canopy forest. Of the 331 green tree frogs observed, 88% were in canopy gaps. Likewise, higher numbers and biomasses of insects were captured in the open gap habitat. Flies were the most commonly collected insect group accounting for 54% of the total capture. These data suggest that one reason green tree frogsmore » were more abundant in canopy gaps was the increased availability of prey and that small canopy gaps provide early successional habitats that are beneficial to green tree frog populations.« less
  • ABSTRACT - We found more green tree frogs ( Hyla cinerea) n canopv gaps than in closed canopy forest. Of the 331 green tree frogs observed, 88% were in canopv gaps. Likewise, higher numbers and biomasses of insects were captured in the open gap habitat Flies were the most commonlv collected insect group accounting for 54% of the total capture. These data suggest that one reason green tree frogs were more abundant in canopy gaps was the increased availability of prey and that small canopy gaps provide early successional habitats that are beneficial to green tree frog populations.
  • Abstract - Microclimate may infl uence use of early successional habitat by birds. We assessed the relationships between avian habitat use and microclimate (temperature, light intensity, and relative humidity) in experimentally created canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest on the Savannah River Site, SC. Gaps were 2- to 3-year-old group-selection timber harvest openings of three sizes (0.13, 0.26, 0.50 ha). Our study was conducted from spring through fall, encompassing four bird-use periods (spring migration, breeding, post-breeding, and fall migration), in 2002 and 2003. We used mist netting and simultaneously recorded microclimate variables to determine the influence of microclimate onmore » bird habitat use. Microclimate was strongly affected by net location within canopy gaps in both years. Temperature generally was higher on the west side of gaps, light intensity was greater in gap centers, and relative humidity was higher on the east side of gaps. However, we found few relationships between bird captures and the microclimate variables. Bird captures were inversely correlated with temperature during the breeding and postbreeding periods in 2002 and positively correlated with temperature during spring 2003. Captures were high where humidity was high during post-breeding 2002, and captures were low where humidity was high during spring 2003. We conclude that variations in the local microclimate had minor infl uence on avian habitat use within gaps. Instead, habitat selection in relatively mild regions like the southeastern US is based primarily on vegetation structure, while other factors, including microclimate, are less important.« less
  • The authors examined spring and summer use of browse by white-tailed deer in forest gaps created by group selection timber harvest at the SRS. Total percentage browse was low in both years, averaging 2.5% of the available browse. Six species were rated high use, 4 species as proportional use and 10 species as low use. Ratings were in agreement to others in the Southeast. Preferred species were maple, winged elm, greenbriar and black willow. Deer browse had very little impact on regeneration of most species.
  • Herpetofaunal Response to Gap and Skidder-Rut Wetland Creation in a Southern Bottomland Hardwood Forest. Cromer R.B., J.D.Lanham, and H.H. Hanlin.Forest Science, 1 May 2002, vol. 48, iss. 2, pp. 407-413(7) We compared herpetofaunal communities in recently harvested gaps, skidder trails, and unharvested depressional wetlands to assess the effects of group-selection harvesting and skidder traffic on reptiles and amphibians in a southern bottomland hardwood forest. From January 1, 1997 to December 31, 1998 we captured 24,292 individuals representing 55 species of reptiles and amphibians at the Savannah River Site in Barnwell County, South Carolina. Forty-two species (n = 6,702 individuals) weremore » captured in gaps, 43 species (n = 8,863 individuals) were captured along skid trails between gaps and 43 species (n = 8,727 individuals) were captured in bottomland depressions over the 2 yr period. Three vegetation variables and six environmental variables were correlated with herpetofaunal abundance. Salamander abundance, especially for species in the genus Ambystoma, was negatively associated with areas with less canopy cover and pronounced rutting (i.e., gaps and skidder trails). Alternatively, treefrog (Hylidae) abundance was positively associated with gap creation. Results from this study suggest that group selection harvests and skidder rutting may alter the herpetofaunal species composition in southern bottomland hardwoods by increasing habitat suitability for some species while diminishing it for others.« less