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Title: TRANSPORTATION NETWORKS: DYNAMICS AND SIMULATION

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
784474
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-01-4031
TRN: AH200137%%128
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 1 Aug 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; SIMULATION; NETWORK ANALYSIS; DYNAMICS

Citation Formats

S. G. EUBANK. TRANSPORTATION NETWORKS: DYNAMICS AND SIMULATION. United States: N. p., 2001. Web.
S. G. EUBANK. TRANSPORTATION NETWORKS: DYNAMICS AND SIMULATION. United States.
S. G. EUBANK. 2001. "TRANSPORTATION NETWORKS: DYNAMICS AND SIMULATION". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/784474.
@article{osti_784474,
title = {TRANSPORTATION NETWORKS: DYNAMICS AND SIMULATION},
author = {S. G. EUBANK},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2001,
month = 8
}

Conference:
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  • The Enhanced Logistics Intra-Theater Support Tool (ELIST) is a simulation-based decision support system that evaluates a military deployment plan at the theater level for transportation and logistical feasibility. ELIST includes a discrete-event, time-stepped simulation kernel written in C, an object-oriented database written in Prolog, and a set of knowledge-bases that describe various operations, such as throughput capacity of ports, based on the attributes of the relevant objects. In the course of its development, ELIST has been used to support various planning activities.
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  • Abstract not provided.