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Title: USING PULSED POWER FOR HYDRODYNAMIC CODE VALIDATION

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
783202
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-01-3083
TRN: AH200134%%283
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 1 Jun 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; HYDRODYNAMICS; VALIDATION; LANL

Citation Formats

R. J. KANZLEITER, W. L. ATCHISON, and ET AL. USING PULSED POWER FOR HYDRODYNAMIC CODE VALIDATION. United States: N. p., 2001. Web.
R. J. KANZLEITER, W. L. ATCHISON, & ET AL. USING PULSED POWER FOR HYDRODYNAMIC CODE VALIDATION. United States.
R. J. KANZLEITER, W. L. ATCHISON, and ET AL. Fri . "USING PULSED POWER FOR HYDRODYNAMIC CODE VALIDATION". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/783202.
@article{osti_783202,
title = {USING PULSED POWER FOR HYDRODYNAMIC CODE VALIDATION},
author = {R. J. KANZLEITER and W. L. ATCHISON and ET AL},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2001},
month = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2001}
}

Conference:
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  • Pulsed power, such as the Sandia Z-machine, is contributing to the understanding of where codes model reality. Fine-zoned Eulerian (and ALE) calculations, for a wide variety of geometries, show elaborate structure such as jets and instabilities, which are not calculated by Lagrangian codes. More and faster computers allow these fine-zoned (1.0 micron or less on a side) calculations to be done. The Z-machine, along with modern diagnostics, which obtain time-dependent images for more than one photon energy response, are well suited to helping us understand, in at least one case, how much of this structure is real. The geometry consideredmore » here is a CH tamped hole in a Au hohlraum for which Eulerian calculations show a jet of Au forming at a corner of the Au and moving through the CH tamping. Subsequently, large amounts of Au move into the hole. Lagrangian calculations show the Au to have only minimal motion. Here pulsed power enables one to determine the better computer model.« less
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