skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: SODIUM HEAT PIPE MODULE TEST FOR SAFE-30 REACTOR PROTOTYPE

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
765045
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-00-4728
TRN: US0100418
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: No conference title supplied, No conference location supplied, No conference dates supplied; Other Information: PBD: 1 Oct 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; HEAT PIPES; SODIUM; REACTOR SAFETY; REACTORS

Citation Formats

R. S. REID, J. T. SENA, and A. L. MARTINEZ. SODIUM HEAT PIPE MODULE TEST FOR SAFE-30 REACTOR PROTOTYPE. United States: N. p., 2000. Web.
R. S. REID, J. T. SENA, & A. L. MARTINEZ. SODIUM HEAT PIPE MODULE TEST FOR SAFE-30 REACTOR PROTOTYPE. United States.
R. S. REID, J. T. SENA, and A. L. MARTINEZ. 2000. "SODIUM HEAT PIPE MODULE TEST FOR SAFE-30 REACTOR PROTOTYPE". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/765045.
@article{osti_765045,
title = {SODIUM HEAT PIPE MODULE TEST FOR SAFE-30 REACTOR PROTOTYPE},
author = {R. S. REID and J. T. SENA and A. L. MARTINEZ},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2000,
month =
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • A heat pipe cooled reactor is one of several candidate reactor cores being considered for advanced space power and propulsion systems to support future space exploration applications. Long life heat pipe modules, with designs verified through a combination of theoretical analysis and experimental lifetime evaluations, would be necessary to establish the viability of any of these candidates, including the heat pipe reactor option. A hardware-based program was initiated to establish the infrastructure necessary to build heat pipe modules. This effort, initiated by Los Alamos National Laboratory and referred to as the Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE) project, set out tomore » fabricate and perform non-nuclear testing on a modular heat pipe reactor prototype that can provide 100-kWt from the core to an energy conversion system at 700 deg. C. Prototypic heat pipe hardware was designed, fabricated, filled, closed-out and acceptance tested. (authors)« less
  • In October 1987, a chemical reactor integrated into a sodium reflux heat-pipe receiver was tested in the solar furnace at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel. The reaction carried out was the carbon dioxide reforming of methane. This reaction is one of the leading candidates for thermochemical energy transport either within a distributed solar receiver system or over long distances. The Schaeffer Solar Furnace consists of a 96 square meter heliostat and a 7.3 meter diameter dish concentrator with a 65-degree rim angle and a 3.5 meter focal length. Measurements have shown a peak concentration ratio of over 10,000more » and a total power of 15 kW at an insolation of 800 w/square meter. The receiver/reactor contains seven catalyst-filled tubes inside an evacuated metal box containing sodium. The front surface of this box serves as the solar absorber of the receiver. In operation, concentrated sunlight heats the 1/8-inch Inconel plate and vaporizes sodium from the wire-mesh wick attached to the back of it. The sodium vapor condenses on the reactor tubes, releases its latent heat, and returns by gravity to the wick. Test results and areas for future development are discussed.« less
  • Two feasibility studies have established baseline designs and performance requirements for heat pipe central solar receivers for Brayton cycle power generation systems. In a program sponsored by the Solar Energy Research Institute, an experimental heat pipe module was fabricated and tested at the Department of Energy's Advanced Component Test Facility (ACTF) on the Georgia Tech campus in Atlanta, Georgia. The experimental module replicates the illuminated surface of the baseline receiver. It consists of seven full-scale sodium heat pipes (diameter = 6 cm, length = 90 cm). The pipes are cooled by water-cooled gas-gap calorimeters which enable accurate measurement of heatmore » pipe power throughput and wide ranges in temperature control. The module was tested in the solar beam for a total of 21 hours. Tests were conducted under steady state insolation conditions, under simulated diurnal start-up conditions, and with natural and induced cloud cover transients. Incident flux levels at the receiver surface reached 90 W/cm/sup 2/. Successful start-up was achieved at rates equivalent to cold receiver start-up to full power in 10 minutes. The module was also successfully operated with one heat pipe purposely failed. The test results demonstrate that heat pipes are capable of meeting the steady state and transient performance requirements of Brayton cycle receivers.« less
  • A reactor experiment was designed to test the sheath insulator component of the thermionic fuel element (TFE) of a space power reactor. In this fully instrumented reactor test, two gas-controlled sodium heat pipes will be used to control the temperature of the sheath insulator specimens to which an external voltage will be applied. The heat pipes were designed with the aid of a computer program, which predicted performance. A demonstrator heat pipe was built and electrically tested. The test results agreed with the prediction as modeled by the computer program.
  • A heat pipe designed to meet the heat transfer requirements of a 100-kW/sub e/ space nuclear power system has been developed and tested. General design requirements for the device included an operating temperature of 1500/sup 0/K with an evaporator radial flux density of 100 w/cm/sup 2/. The total heat-pipe length of 2 m comprised an evaporator length of 0.3 m, a 1.2-m adiabatic section, and a condenser length of 0.5 m. A four-artery design employing screen arteries and distribution wicks was used with lithium serving as the working fluid. Molybdenum alloys were used for the screen materials and tube shell.more » Hafnium and zirconium gettering materials were used in connection with a pre-purified distilled lithium charge to ensure internal chemical compatibility. After initial performance verification, the 14.1-mm i.d. heat pipe was operated at 15 kW throughput at 1500/sup 0/K for 100 hours. No performance degradation was observed during the test.« less