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Title: A Description of the Revised ATHEANA (A Technique for Human Event Analysis)

Abstract

This paper describes the most recent version of a human reliability analysis (HRA) method called ``A Technique for Human Event Analysis'' (ATHEANA). The new version is documented in NUREG-1624, Rev. 1 [1] and reflects improvements to the method based on comments received from a peer review that was held in 1998 (see [2] for a detailed discussion of the peer review comments) and on the results of an initial trial application of the method conducted at a nuclear power plant in 1997 (see Appendix A in [3]). A summary of the more important recommendations resulting from the peer review and trial application is provided and critical and unique aspects of the revised method are discussed.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
761062
Report Number(s):
SAND2000-1757C
TRN: US0005291
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: PSAM 5, International Conference on Probabilistic Safety Assessment and Management, Osaka (JP), 11/27/2000--12/01/2000; Other Information: PBD: 18 Jul 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; HUMAN POPULATIONS; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; RECOMMENDATIONS; RELIABILITY; A CODES; HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING

Citation Formats

FORESTER,JOHN A., BLEY,DENNIS C., COOPER,SUSANE, KOLACZKOWSKI,ALAN M., THOMPSON,CATHERINE, RAMEY-SMITH,ANN, and WREATHALL,JOHN. A Description of the Revised ATHEANA (A Technique for Human Event Analysis). United States: N. p., 2000. Web.
FORESTER,JOHN A., BLEY,DENNIS C., COOPER,SUSANE, KOLACZKOWSKI,ALAN M., THOMPSON,CATHERINE, RAMEY-SMITH,ANN, & WREATHALL,JOHN. A Description of the Revised ATHEANA (A Technique for Human Event Analysis). United States.
FORESTER,JOHN A., BLEY,DENNIS C., COOPER,SUSANE, KOLACZKOWSKI,ALAN M., THOMPSON,CATHERINE, RAMEY-SMITH,ANN, and WREATHALL,JOHN. Tue . "A Description of the Revised ATHEANA (A Technique for Human Event Analysis)". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/761062.
@article{osti_761062,
title = {A Description of the Revised ATHEANA (A Technique for Human Event Analysis)},
author = {FORESTER,JOHN A. and BLEY,DENNIS C. and COOPER,SUSANE and KOLACZKOWSKI,ALAN M. and THOMPSON,CATHERINE and RAMEY-SMITH,ANN and WREATHALL,JOHN},
abstractNote = {This paper describes the most recent version of a human reliability analysis (HRA) method called ``A Technique for Human Event Analysis'' (ATHEANA). The new version is documented in NUREG-1624, Rev. 1 [1] and reflects improvements to the method based on comments received from a peer review that was held in 1998 (see [2] for a detailed discussion of the peer review comments) and on the results of an initial trial application of the method conducted at a nuclear power plant in 1997 (see Appendix A in [3]). A summary of the more important recommendations resulting from the peer review and trial application is provided and critical and unique aspects of the revised method are discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jul 18 00:00:00 EDT 2000},
month = {Tue Jul 18 00:00:00 EDT 2000}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • Over the past several years, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has sponsored the development of a new method for performing human reliability analyses (HRAs). A major impetus for the program was the recognized need for a method that would not only address errors of omission (EOOs), but also errors of commission (EOCs). Although several documents have been issued describing the basis and development of the new method referred to as ``A Technique for Human Event Analysis`` (ATHEANA), two documents were drafted to initially provide the necessary documentation for applying the method: the frame of reference (FOR) manual, which servedmore » as the technical basis document for the method and the implementation guideline (IG), which provided step by step guidance for applying the method. Upon the completion of the draft FOR manual and the draft IG in April 1997, along with several step-throughs of the process by the development team, the method was ready for a third-party test. The method was demonstrated at Seabrook Station in July 1997. The main goals of the demonstration were to (1) test the ATHENA process as described in the FOR manual and the IG, (2) test a training package developed for the method, (3) test the hypothesis that plant operators and trainers have significant insight into the EFCs that can make UAs more likely, and (4) identify ways to improve the method and its documentation. The results of the Seabrook demonstration are evaluated against the success criteria, and important findings and recommendations regarding ATHENA that were obtained from the demonstration are presented here.« less
  • This paper presents results from the quantification of the three human failure events (HFEs) identified using the ATHEANA methodology as discussed in an earlier companion paper presented at this conference. Sections describe the quantification task, important basic events, and the results obtained from quantifying the three HFEs that were identified -- the first two of which were simulated at the Seabrook Station Simulator.
  • In May of 1998, a technical basis and implementation guidelines document for A Technique for Human Event Analysis (ATHEANA) was issued as a draft report for public comment (NUREG-1624). In conjunction with the release of the draft NUREG, a paper review of the method, its documentation, and the results of an initial test of the method was held over a two-day period in Seattle, Washington, in June of 1998. Four internationally-known and respected experts in human reliability analysis (HRA) were selected to serve as the peer reviewers and were paid for their services. In addition, approximately 20 other individuals withmore » an interest in HRA and ATHEANA also attended the peer review meeting and were invited to provide comments. The peer review team was asked to comment on any aspect of the method or the report in which improvements could be made and to discuss its strengths and weaknesses. All of the reviewers thought the ATEANA method had made significant contributions to the field of PRA/HRA, in particular by addressing the most important open questions and issues in HRA, by attempting to develop an integrated approach, and by developing a framework capable of identifying types of unsafe actions that generally have not been considered using existing methods. The reviewers had many concerns about specific aspects of the methodology and made many recommendations for ways to improve and extend the method, and to make its application more cost effective and useful to PRA in general. Details of the reviewers` comments and the ATHEANA team`s responses to specific criticisms will be discussed.« less
  • In May of 1998, a technical basis and implementation guidelines document for A Technique for Human Event Analysis (ATHEANA) was issued as a draft report for public comment (NUREG-1624). In conjunction with the release of draft NUREG- 1624, a peer review of the new human reliability analysis method its documentation and the results of an initial test of the method was held over a two-day period in June 1998 in Seattle, Washington. Four internationally known and respected experts in HK4 or probabilistic risk assessment were selected to serve as the peer reviewers. In addition, approximately 20 other individuals with anmore » interest in HRA and ATHEANA also attended the peer and were invited to provide comments. The peer review team was asked to comment on any aspect of the method or the report in which improvements could be made and to discuss its strengths and weaknesses. They were asked to focus on two major aspects: Are the basic premises of ATHEANA on solid ground and is the conceptual basis adequate? Is the ATHEANA implementation process adequate given the description of the intended users in the documentation? The four peer reviewers asked questions and provided oral comments during the peer review meeting and provided written comments approximately two weeks after the completion of the meeting. This paper discusses their major comments.« less
  • This paper describes the knowledge base for the application of the new human reliability analysis (HRA) method, a ``A Technique for Human Error Analysis`` (ATHEANA). Since application of ATHEANA requires the identification of previously unmodeled human failure events, especially errors of commission, and associated error-forcing contexts (i.e., combinations of plant conditions and performance shaping factors), this knowledge base is an essential aid for the HRA analyst.