skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Exhaust aftertreatment using plasma-assisted catalysis

Abstract

In the field of catalysis, one application that has been classified as a breakthrough technology is the catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} in oxygen-rich environments using hydrocarbons. This breakthrough will require dramatic improvements in both catalyst and engine technology, but the benefits will be substantial for energy efficiency and a cleaner environment. Engine and automobile companies are placing greater emphasis on the diesel engine because of its potential for saving fuel resources and reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. The modern direct-injection diesel engine offers demonstrated fuel economy advantages unmatched by any other commercially-viable engine. The main drawback of diesel engines is exhaust emissions. A modification of existing oxidation catalyst/engine technology is being used to address the CO, hydrocarbon and particulates. However, no satisfactory solution currently exists for NO{sub x}. Diesel engines operate under net oxidizing conditions, thus rendering conventional three-way catalytic converters ineffective for the controlling the NO{sub x} emission. NO{sub x} reduction catalysts, using ammonia as a reductant, do exist for oxygen-rich exhausts; however, for transportation applications, the use of on-board hydrocarbon fuels is a more feasible, cost-effective, and environmentally-sound approach. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) by hydrocarbons is one of the leading catalytic aftertreatment technologies for the reduction of NO{submore » x} in lean-burn engine exhaust (often referred to as lean-NO{sub x}). The objective is to chemically reduce the pollutant molecules of NO{sub x} to benign molecules such as N{sub 2}. Aftertreatment schemes have focused a great deal on the reduction of NO because the NO{sub x} in engine exhaust is composed primarily of NO. Recent studies, however, have shown that the oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2} serves an important role in enhancing the efficiency for reduction of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2}. It has become apparent that preconverting NO to NO{sub 2} could improve both the efficiency and durability of lean-NO{sub x} catalysts. A non-thermal plasma is an efficient means for selective partial oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2}. The use of a non-thermal plasma in combination with a lean-NO{sub x} catalyst opens the opportunity for catalysts that are more efficient and more durable compared to conventional catalysts. In the absence of hydrocarbons, the O radicals will oxidize NO to NO{sub 2}, and the OH radicals will further oxidize NO{sub 2} to nitric acid. In plasma-assisted catalysis it is important that the plasma oxidize NO to NO{sub 2} without further producing acids.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Research (ER) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
756802
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JC-137288; KC0302010
KC0302010; TRN: AH200025%%11
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Clean Fuels 2000, San Diego, CA (US), 02/07/2000--02/09/2000; Other Information: PBD: 20 Jan 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; DIESEL ENGINES; EXHAUST GASES; CATALYTIC CONVERTERS; NITROGEN OXIDES; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION; NITRIC OXIDE; PARTIAL OXIDATION PROCESSES

Citation Formats

Penetrante, B. Exhaust aftertreatment using plasma-assisted catalysis. United States: N. p., 2000. Web.
Penetrante, B. Exhaust aftertreatment using plasma-assisted catalysis. United States.
Penetrante, B. 2000. "Exhaust aftertreatment using plasma-assisted catalysis". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/756802.
@article{osti_756802,
title = {Exhaust aftertreatment using plasma-assisted catalysis},
author = {Penetrante, B},
abstractNote = {In the field of catalysis, one application that has been classified as a breakthrough technology is the catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} in oxygen-rich environments using hydrocarbons. This breakthrough will require dramatic improvements in both catalyst and engine technology, but the benefits will be substantial for energy efficiency and a cleaner environment. Engine and automobile companies are placing greater emphasis on the diesel engine because of its potential for saving fuel resources and reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. The modern direct-injection diesel engine offers demonstrated fuel economy advantages unmatched by any other commercially-viable engine. The main drawback of diesel engines is exhaust emissions. A modification of existing oxidation catalyst/engine technology is being used to address the CO, hydrocarbon and particulates. However, no satisfactory solution currently exists for NO{sub x}. Diesel engines operate under net oxidizing conditions, thus rendering conventional three-way catalytic converters ineffective for the controlling the NO{sub x} emission. NO{sub x} reduction catalysts, using ammonia as a reductant, do exist for oxygen-rich exhausts; however, for transportation applications, the use of on-board hydrocarbon fuels is a more feasible, cost-effective, and environmentally-sound approach. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) by hydrocarbons is one of the leading catalytic aftertreatment technologies for the reduction of NO{sub x} in lean-burn engine exhaust (often referred to as lean-NO{sub x}). The objective is to chemically reduce the pollutant molecules of NO{sub x} to benign molecules such as N{sub 2}. Aftertreatment schemes have focused a great deal on the reduction of NO because the NO{sub x} in engine exhaust is composed primarily of NO. Recent studies, however, have shown that the oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2} serves an important role in enhancing the efficiency for reduction of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2}. It has become apparent that preconverting NO to NO{sub 2} could improve both the efficiency and durability of lean-NO{sub x} catalysts. A non-thermal plasma is an efficient means for selective partial oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2}. The use of a non-thermal plasma in combination with a lean-NO{sub x} catalyst opens the opportunity for catalysts that are more efficient and more durable compared to conventional catalysts. In the absence of hydrocarbons, the O radicals will oxidize NO to NO{sub 2}, and the OH radicals will further oxidize NO{sub 2} to nitric acid. In plasma-assisted catalysis it is important that the plasma oxidize NO to NO{sub 2} without further producing acids.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/756802}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {1}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: