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Title: Contamination free helium leak detection of sensitive systems

Abstract

High Technology Systems (HTS) with sensitive surfaces, such as superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerating cavities, polarized electron sources (PES) for accelerators and many others, are prone to degradation when subjected to particulate or hydrocarbon contaminants. Particulate contamination control of SRF cavity surfaces and vacuum components have been discussed by several authors at this contamination workshop. Hydrocarbon contamination mainly results from prolonged evacuation with conventional oil lubricated pumping systems and/or prolonged leak detection with conventional leak detectors. The sensitivity of the conventional leak detectors suffers due to the back-streaming of atmospheric helium (5 x 10{sup {minus}1} Pa) through the pumping systems and/or the trapping of helium in the O-rings and oils of the pumping systems. This reduced sensitivity leads to the use of the leak detectors over long periods of time for detecting small (1 x 10{sup {minus}10} atm. cc s{sup {minus}1}) leaks in HTS thereby exposing the sensitive surfaces to contamination. In this paper, a review of the work in progress, at Thomas Jefferson Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab), in reducing the contamination of sensitive surfaces is presented.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Research (ER) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
755830
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/40150-1477; JLAB-ACC-97-04
TRN: US0002758
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-84ER40150
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, No location, No date; Other Information: PBD: 1 Jan 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; CEBAF ACCELERATOR; SUPERCONDUCTING CAVITY RESONATORS; IMPURITIES; VACUUM SYSTEMS; LEAK DETECTORS; LEAK TESTING; SENSITIVITY

Citation Formats

Myneni, G. Contamination free helium leak detection of sensitive systems. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Myneni, G. Contamination free helium leak detection of sensitive systems. United States.
Myneni, G. Wed . "Contamination free helium leak detection of sensitive systems". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/755830.
@article{osti_755830,
title = {Contamination free helium leak detection of sensitive systems},
author = {Myneni, G},
abstractNote = {High Technology Systems (HTS) with sensitive surfaces, such as superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerating cavities, polarized electron sources (PES) for accelerators and many others, are prone to degradation when subjected to particulate or hydrocarbon contaminants. Particulate contamination control of SRF cavity surfaces and vacuum components have been discussed by several authors at this contamination workshop. Hydrocarbon contamination mainly results from prolonged evacuation with conventional oil lubricated pumping systems and/or prolonged leak detection with conventional leak detectors. The sensitivity of the conventional leak detectors suffers due to the back-streaming of atmospheric helium (5 x 10{sup {minus}1} Pa) through the pumping systems and/or the trapping of helium in the O-rings and oils of the pumping systems. This reduced sensitivity leads to the use of the leak detectors over long periods of time for detecting small (1 x 10{sup {minus}10} atm. cc s{sup {minus}1}) leaks in HTS thereby exposing the sensitive surfaces to contamination. In this paper, a review of the work in progress, at Thomas Jefferson Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab), in reducing the contamination of sensitive surfaces is presented.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/755830}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1997},
month = {1}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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