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Title: Radioactive waste: Politics and technology

Abstract

This book presents an analysis of the divergent strategies used to forge radioactive waste policies in great Britain, Germany, and Sweden. Some basic knowledge of nuclear technology and its public policy development is needed. The book points out that developing institutional frameworks that permit agreement and consent is the principal challenge of radwaste management and places the problem of consent in an institutional framework.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
75492
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Other Information: DN: From review by Elizabeth Peelle, Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Forum, Vol. 10, No. 2 (Sum 1995); PBD: [1995]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT; GLOBAL ASPECTS; SWEDEN; UNITED KINGDOM; FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY

Citation Formats

Berkhout, F. Radioactive waste: Politics and technology. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Berkhout, F. Radioactive waste: Politics and technology. United States.
Berkhout, F. 1995. "Radioactive waste: Politics and technology". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_75492,
title = {Radioactive waste: Politics and technology},
author = {Berkhout, F.},
abstractNote = {This book presents an analysis of the divergent strategies used to forge radioactive waste policies in great Britain, Germany, and Sweden. Some basic knowledge of nuclear technology and its public policy development is needed. The book points out that developing institutional frameworks that permit agreement and consent is the principal challenge of radwaste management and places the problem of consent in an institutional framework.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month = 8
}

Book:
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  • This article is a book review. The book contains a detailed look at the safe handling and disposal of radioactive wastes. The nature and hazards of radioactivity are discussed. A description of the fuel cycle is presented. A detailed account of the history of radioactive waste management is presented. Options for waste management are considered and the present government policies are analyzed. Requirements and recommendations for a successful program are outlined. The book is written in lay language and presents a clear picture of a complex problem and gives insight into the principles and practices of nuclear energy. (RJC)
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  • What role does public acceptance play in the siting of facilities and the selection of technologies designed to manage nuclear waste That's the question posed by Ray Kemp in The Politics of Radioactive Waste Disposal. To answer this question, Kemp assesses and compares the decision-making processes in Western Europe, Canada, and the United States.
  • An inevitable consequence of the use of radioactive materials is the generation of radioactive wastes and the public policy debate over how they will be managed. In 1980, Congress shifted responsibility for the disposal of low-level radioactive wastes from the federal government to the states. This act represented a sharp departure from more than 30 years of virtually absolute federal control over radioactive materials. Though this plan had the enthusiastic support of the states in 1980, it now appears to have been at best a chimera. Radioactive waste management has become an increasingly complicated and controversial issue for society inmore » recent years. This book discusses only low-level wastes, however, because Congress decided for political reasons to treat them differently than high-level wastes. The book is based in part on three symposia sponsored by the division of Chemistry and the Law of the American Chemical Society. Each chapter is derived in full or in part from presentations made at these meetings, and includes: (1) Low-level radioactive wastes in the nuclear power industry; (2) Low-level radiation cancer risk assessment and government regulation to protect public health; and (3) Low-level radioactive waste: can new disposal sites be found.« less
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