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Title: Transportation energy conservation policies. [Higher gasoline taxes and new car fuel economy standards are effective]

Abstract

The period 1950 to 1972 is examined with respect to personal travel and energy use for it, the relative energy efficiencies of different urban and intercity passenger systems are reviewed, several policies for reducing transportation fuel use are discussed, and the energy savings likely with each of these policies in 1980 and 1985 are compared. Four policies were selected for discussion here: (i) improving mass transit, (ii) increasing carpooling, (iii) raising gasoline prices, and (iv) imposing new car fuel economy standards. These were chosen because they are important and widely discussed, and because there are analyses with which to evaluate their effectiveness. However, there are several other options, such as stricter enforcement of a speed limit of 55 mph, wider adoption of right-turn-on-red, better urban traffic control systems, and a host of changes related to air traffic and freight traffic. It was concluded that, during the next decade at least, significant passenger transportation energy savings can be achieved only by improving new car fuel economy; such improvements can either be required by legislation or induced by increases in gasoline prices. Behavioral changes (greater use of mass transit and carpooling) are surprisingly insensitive to purely economic forces unless they are somore » strong as to be politically infeasible. The results suggest the need for more and better programs to encourage people to change their attitudes toward energy use and personal transportation. (auth, from Introduction)« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN
OSTI Identifier:
7366585
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Science; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 192:4234
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; AUTOMOBILES; FUEL CONSUMPTION; ENERGY CONSERVATION; ENERGY POLICY; TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS; CARPOOLING; ENERGY DEMAND; GASOLINE; URBAN AREAS; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; FUELS; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; VEHICLES; 291000* - Energy Planning & Policy- Conservation; 298000 - Energy Planning & Policy- Consumption & Utilization; 320203 - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Transportation- Land & Roadway; 330100 - Internal Combustion Engines

Citation Formats

Hirst, E. Transportation energy conservation policies. [Higher gasoline taxes and new car fuel economy standards are effective]. United States: N. p., 1976. Web.
Hirst, E. Transportation energy conservation policies. [Higher gasoline taxes and new car fuel economy standards are effective]. United States.
Hirst, E. Fri . "Transportation energy conservation policies. [Higher gasoline taxes and new car fuel economy standards are effective]". United States.
@article{osti_7366585,
title = {Transportation energy conservation policies. [Higher gasoline taxes and new car fuel economy standards are effective]},
author = {Hirst, E},
abstractNote = {The period 1950 to 1972 is examined with respect to personal travel and energy use for it, the relative energy efficiencies of different urban and intercity passenger systems are reviewed, several policies for reducing transportation fuel use are discussed, and the energy savings likely with each of these policies in 1980 and 1985 are compared. Four policies were selected for discussion here: (i) improving mass transit, (ii) increasing carpooling, (iii) raising gasoline prices, and (iv) imposing new car fuel economy standards. These were chosen because they are important and widely discussed, and because there are analyses with which to evaluate their effectiveness. However, there are several other options, such as stricter enforcement of a speed limit of 55 mph, wider adoption of right-turn-on-red, better urban traffic control systems, and a host of changes related to air traffic and freight traffic. It was concluded that, during the next decade at least, significant passenger transportation energy savings can be achieved only by improving new car fuel economy; such improvements can either be required by legislation or induced by increases in gasoline prices. Behavioral changes (greater use of mass transit and carpooling) are surprisingly insensitive to purely economic forces unless they are so strong as to be politically infeasible. The results suggest the need for more and better programs to encourage people to change their attitudes toward energy use and personal transportation. (auth, from Introduction)},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/7366585}, journal = {Science; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 192:4234,
place = {United States},
year = {1976},
month = {4}
}